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Parks & nature in Apennine Mountains

Park
“Explore the beautiful Krka National Park! You can get to Krka by city bus and ferry. However, the most convenient option is to book a tour. Tour busses usually leave from Split bus station, which is 2km from the studio. Entry to the sight costs around 160 HRK. Tour ticket price range: $$$ Travel time: 2 hours”
340local recommendations
Park
“Villa Borghese is a landscape garden in the naturalistic English manner in Rome, containing a number of buildings, museums (see Galleria Borghese) and attractions. It is the third largest public park in Rome (80 hectares or 197.7 acres) after the ones of the Villa Doria Pamphili and Villa Ada. ”
557local recommendations
National Park
“The most beautiful Parc along the coast is not far from the property, it is possible to go there by car or by train.”
299local recommendations
Sculpture Garden
“Can't miss it, great gardens and museums to spend the whole day, be ready to walk and enjoy a great morning or afternoon!”
353local recommendations
Park
“Toss a coin in the fountain from over your shoulder and you'll come back to Rome again”
302local recommendations
Plaza
“For sure the most breathtaking view of the city. Go there at sunset time. The sun goes down behind the city and you will get amazing pictures! As you go up there visit also San Miniato al Monte one of the most beautiful and hidden churches in town.”
375local recommendations
Park
“Do not miss a visit to the famous Mount Vesuvius, the volcano that destroyed the ancient city of Pompeii. The cost to climb to the top is 10 euros and you do not necessarily need a tour guide. The effort to get there will be rewarded with a view of the Bay of Naples that will leave you speechless. You can go to Vesuvius by car using google maps.”
83local recommendations
Park
“Declared a national park in 1980, this island ecosystem has a story of its own. Rich in marine life, Kornati national park is equipped with 8 hiking tracks leading up viewpoint overlooking the entire park. Rich in animal life, there are over 850 living species in the sea, making it perfect for snorkelling and discovering new depths.”
152local recommendations
Park
“Paklenica not only is a famous national park, but it is also the most popular climbing site in Croatia, and some say, even in all of Southern Europe. Boasting with natural beauty, the Paklenica national park has over 400 marked climbing routes of various difficulties perfect for all climbers - those with a lot of experience, or those just getting to know this sport.”
128local recommendations
Park
“Wide public park where you can enjoy walking and running far away from the city mood. There are some playground as well and a romantic lake. It was the country residence of a ancient roman nobility family, so you can have an idea about their life style.”
313local recommendations
Monument / Landmark
“This is a superb spot to peacefully watch the sun go down to the mesmerising tones of Zadar's most popular attraction.”
124local recommendations
Waterfall
“Great nature! Be aware that you must book your ticket online one day prior visit.”
169local recommendations
Park
“Brijuni National Park (island) - see their official page for tours! Recommended!”
151local recommendations
Park
“This Natural park is an oasi where you can connect with nature and see animals at arms lenght distance, it is possible to book a horse carriage visit of the park and arrive to see the beach.”
103local recommendations
Other Great Outdoors
“There are designated areas where you can BBQ and enjoy this beautiful cape even more!”
184local recommendations
Beach
“Amalfi nestles in the ravine of the Valle dei Mulini. Its churches, towers, and arcaded houses, grouped together with attractive irregularity, rise above a small harbor, and are backed by precipices of wild magnificence. In its heyday, when it was a Maritime Republic, Amalfi rivaled Pisa, Genoa and Venice. By the 7th century the city was ruled by Doges, as Venice, and was recognized as the greatest naval power in the West. Its navel expertise led to the invention of the compass and the codification of the earliest maritime laws. In the 12th century, this great maritime republic had a population of 100,00 people who masterminded regional trade with the East. Shortly afterwards, the Normans from Sicily vanquished Amalfi and the city was repeatedly sacked by Pisa, its greatest rival. Amalfi merchants established trading posts in Byzantium, Asia Minor and Africa. In the Holy Land, they founded the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem, from which the Crusader Knights of St. John developed. Their symbol, the Maltese cross, is still carved on Amalfi's street comers. Webster's brooding revenge drama, The Duchess of Malfi, was based on the tragic life of Joanna of Aragon, the Duke of Amalfi's consort in the 15th century. The Regatta of the Four Ancient Maritime Republics, complete with galleons, is a magnificent evocation of the past, held in Amalfi every four years. Since the collapse of the republic, Amalfi sunk into oblivion until Edwardian times. As a favorite winter resort, it was then a genteel haunt for foreigners who tireed of the excesses on the French Riviera. Amalfi today, with a population of 6,000, is a shadow of its former self but retains an air of faded elegance. Horse-drawn carts still ply the Lungomare dei Cavalieri for visitors' amusement, much as they did in Edwardian days. The Duomo, the glittering Cathedral, is viewed from down below. The steep walk up is a chance to appreciate the spindly Moorish archways andgeometric facade, inlaid with vivid mosaics. While looking autenthentic, the facade was reconstructed in the 19th century, based on the medieval model, Henry Swinburne, the 18th century traveler, was not sympathetic to the Arab influences, calling the cathedral typical of the "barbarous ages, when Grecian rules and proportions were forgotten". Yet framed by mountains and monasteries, the Norman Saracen bell-tower presents a striking vision to visitors. The baroque interior leads to a crypt containing the remains of St. Andrew the Apostle, moved here from Constantinople in 1208. Like the miraculous liquefaction of San Gennaro's blood in Naples, the cult of St. Andrew, a mysterious oil, is said to seep from his bones. Even St. Francis of Assisi declared himself a devotee.”
92local recommendations