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Best things to do in Hhohho Region

Discover the city according to locals. Find the best things to do, places to eat, and get priceless advice from the people who live here.

Point of Interest
“Take a photo of the Jock of the Bushveld statue in Baberton or visit the Jock of the Bushveld Memorial after the Mac-Mac Pools 18km outside Sabie. Ceramic tiles on the memorial indicate the rivers and routes used by coaches and transport riders during the times ofSir Percy Fitzpatrick and Jock”
1 local recommends
Breakfast Spot
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Point of Interest
“Coral Stephens workshop in the Piggs Peak was established over 60 years ago, to teach traditional skills to local women, and produces a range of fine, hand-woven fabrics that sell worldwide”
1 local recommends
Administrative Area Level 1
“Hhohho is a region of Swaziland, located in the north western part of Swaziland from the north and running southwards to the centre, Hhohho was named after the capital of King Mswati II, who expanded the Swazi territory to the north and west, taking in the districts of Barberton, Nelspruit, Carolina and Piet Retief.[1] These areas were later acquired by what was the Province of Transvaal and today they form part of the Mpumalanga Province of South Africa. It has an area of 3,625.17 km², a population of 282,734 (2007), and is divided into 14 tinkhundla. The administrative center is the national capital of Mbabane. It borders Lubombo Region on the southeast and Manzini Region in the southwest. The name Hhohho was the name of the royal capital of Mswati II, a 19th-century king of Swaziland. After the Anglo-Boer war, Swaziland came under British administration. A partition of the country into districts followed and Hhohho was the name chosen for the northernmost district. The region of Swaziland which is today Hhohho was inhabited in earlier times by the Khoisan people. Later, Bantu settlers of Nguni and Sotho origin established settlements in the area. The land was later conquered by King Sobhuza I in the early 19th century as he relocated his capital from Zombodze in present-day Shiselweni, to Zombodze in the centre of Swaziland. Sotho clans such as the Gama, Mnisi and Magagula, and Nguni clans such as the Maseko, were incorporated into the Swazi state. The royal capital of Sobhuza was built in what forms the Ezulwini valley (valley of heaven). This land was chosen for its impenetrability by invaders, and for its fertility, and good rivers. Under the rule of King Mswati II, the royal capital of the king was constructed north of the country and was called Hhohho. This is the eponym of the Hhohho region. This briefly shifted the political centre of Swaziland northwards, first to minimise the danger of invasion by Zulu forces from the south, and later to expand and conquer lands in the north. Indeed, Mswati's armies expanded the territory of Swaziland. More royal outposts were constructed in towns that are now in South Africa's Mpumalanga province. The loss of the territory occurred after Mswati's reign had ended, and was spurred by the concession hunters, and settlers in the territory that became the Transvaal Republic. In the northwest of Swaziland, gold was discovered, drawing a large number of miners and settlers in the area. Gold deposits were first recorded around Piggs Peak during modern times in 1872 and in 1884 a gold-bearing reef was discovered in the hills to the west by the prospector, William Pigg, after whom the town is named. Other mining adventures took place in the neighbouring town of Bulembu, where later on, asbestos was mined. The town of Ngwenya on the western border of Swaziland with South Africa, is home to the oldest known iron-ore mine in the world. Commercial scale mining took place in the mine until 1977. During Swaziland's status as a British protectorate (1903–68), Hhohho borders were officially drawn, with its capital, and that of the country being Mbabane. The British resident commissioner had his offices in the town. The city, the meaning of whose name is believed to originate from a “small and bitter highveld plant” that grew in the area, is named after Chief Mbabane Kunene. The Hhohho region is governed by the regional administrator, who is appointed by the king. The present regional administrator is Dr Ben Sibandze. The seat of the regional administration is in the regional capital, Mbabane. Mbabane is also the administrative capital of Swaziland. Hhohho is subdivided to 14 tinkhundla, or constituencies. These are local administration centres, and also parliamentary constituencies. Each inkhundla is headed by an indvuna yenkhundla or governor with the help of bucopho. The tinkhundla are further divided into chiefdoms. The present tinkhundla are: Hhukwini Lobamba Madlangempisi Maphalaleni Mayiwane Mbabane East Mbabane West Mhlangatane Motjane Ndzingeni Nkhaba Ntfonjeni Piggs Peak Timpisini The legal system in Hhohho follows that of the whole country. There are magistrate courts which administer Roman-Dutch law. Hhohho is the most economically advanced region of Swaziland. Being home to the capital of the country, and hosting a significant fraction of the Manzini-Mbabane corridor, it has Swaziland's biggest urbanized population. The economy of the region is dominated by services, tourism, and forestry. The capital, Mbabane is home to the headquarters of many of Swaziland's corporations. The central bank of Swaziland is located in Mbabane, so are the headquarters of Standard Bank, Nedbank, Swazi Bank, First National Bank and Swaziland Building Society. The other financial services companies located in Mbabane include: African Alliance, Select Management Services, Swaziland Revenue Authority, among many others. The forestry industry is one of the m”
1 local recommends
Premise
“Maguga Dam is great for fishing or just being around the water. Maguga Lodge is set on the dam and has accommodations and a nice restaurant. There is also a houseboat on the dam that can be rented for a day or overnight through Hawane Resort. Rates are E1400 for 2pax, E1600 for 4pax (call the resort and ask for Phindile. 2444-1744”
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Natural Feature
“The nature reserve is part of the 600 ha Phophonyane Conservancy in the mountainous north-west of Swaziland. It falls within the Barberton Centre of Endemism, an area of global biodiversity significance. The central feature of the reserve is the Phophonyane Falls, a series of cascades and waterfalls which stretches for 3 kilometres and bisects the reserve along the geologically remarkable Phophonyane Shear Zone. The shear zone is the boundary between two continental blocks representing different environments within the earth’s crust.”
1 local recommends
Route
“Along the MR1 between Hawane and Malolotja there are roadside workshops and outlets, showcasing arts and crafts by local craftspeople from the community at work, some of which is made on the spot.”
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Shopping Centre
“Unique Locally produced craft products. Also has a coffe shop with great views.”
1 local recommends
Point of Interest
“Lion Cavern, situated at Ngwenya mine is the oldest mine in the world. Man first began chipping away at the iron ore of Ngwenya mountain over 43,000 years ago. The more modern mining of Ngwenya Mine was carried out from 1958 until 1979, in the form of open cast mining creating the dramatic mine pit currently still visible.”
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Premise
“guets get to learn about our late Kings and Queens and also see the cars they used in the ancient times”
1 local recommends
Natural Feature
Lodging
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Car Rental