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Things to do in Municipio XV

Top recommendations from locals

From sightseeing to hidden gems, find out what makes the city unique with the help of the locals who know it best.
Park
“Villa Borghese is a landscape garden in Rome, containing a number of buildings, museums and attractions”
  • 540 locals recommend
Plaza
“Piazza del Popolo Between the elegant Pincio, and the banks of the Tevere, Piazza del Popolo yawns into an enormous ellipse. Churches, fountains, monuments, and marble memoirs of historic events in Rome both ancient and modern tastefully embellish the square. Since antiquity, the city's Northern entrance formed a vestibule into the city through the gate in the Aurelian Walls. Though now known as Porta del Popolo, it has had various names over the centuries. Originally called Porta Flaminia by the Emperor Aurelianus who commissioned its construction, during the Early Medieval period, it was called Porta San Valentino, after the nearest Catacomb. Finally the name Porta del Popolo was agreed on, as the church adjoining the gate is Santa Maria del Popolo. Piazza del Popolo itself was known as Piazza del Trullo in the Middle Ages, after the conical fountain which once stood in the centre of the square, reminiscent of a characteristic South-Italian dwelling. Its present name may be due to the poplar tree, known in Latin as "populus" which also meant people, an apt association, as various public events such as fairs, games and dramatic executions were held there. For centuries Piazza del Popolo had a public fountain, a horse trough and a cistern for washerwomen. It was Sixtus V, in 1589, who turned his attention to the square. The Trullo fountain, under the supervision and workmanship of Domenico Fontana, was to be replaced with the Egyptian obelisk of Ramesses II, second in age and height only to the one in San Giovanni,originally brought to the city by the Emperor Augustus, and put in Circus Maximus. Its transportation and installation in Piazza del Popolo gave the square a more regal, less domestic air. Four lions water basin, were added to the obelisk in 1823, during the reign of Pope Leo XII. The next event to prompt work on Piazza del Popolo was the arrival of the Swedish Queen Christina. Desiring to convert to Roman Catholicism, she arrived to Rome in 1655, to a splendid Roman welcome: coming from the North, her first vision was through Porta del Popolo. Bernini had been commissioned to restore the inner façade of the ancient gate in preparation for her arrival. A plaque was placed above the arch, reading: "FELICI FAUSTOQUE INGRESSUI MDCLV" (For a Happy and Propitious Entrance) which remains to this day. Her entrance was so "felicitous" that she never left Rome again. Towards the end of the Seventeen Hundreds, amid the Napoleonic invasion, the ever increasing flood of visitors and pilgrims, descending on Rome through Porta del Popolo, prompted the decision to modernize the square. Till the Eighteen Hundreds, the square had a trapezoidal form which converged on the gate. During the Napoleonic epoch, the French Prefect, Tournon, was head of the "Commission of Embellishments" in Rome. He commissioned Valadier, a Roman architect, to redesign Piazza del Popolo, which he did to stunning effect. Works began in 1816, lasting till 1824 and marked the first time, since the French occupation, that prisoners were not used for works. The project was to take into account the important existing buildings: three churches, Santa Maria Del Popolo, Santa Maria di Montesanto (Saint Mary of Montesanto), Santa Maria dei Miracoli (Saint Mary of Miracles), the obelisk, Porta Del Popolo and Via del Corso, which were to remain untouched. The lateral structures were swept away redefining the square as an ellipse and were replaced by spacious exedras. These supported the fountains of Neptunebetween two tritons, and of the Goddess Roma on either side, added in 1823 during the reign of Pope Leo XII. The square became then accessible from side to side, as well as each end. With a touch of genius, the square was connected to the park on the hill above with a flight of curving steps and ramps, causing the Pincio hill to seem to cascade into the square below. Piazza del Popolo was the last papal contribution to Rome's legendary architecture, and in many ways reflects its splendor, inspiring a sense of awe in the visitor. Emphasizing this supremacy, the three churches dedicated to the Virgin, surrounded the obelisk which, in ancient times had been dedicated to the pagan Sun god. The twin churches at the far end of Piazza del Popolo, which Valadier had incorporated into his plans, had been constructed well over a century earlier. Though initiated by Carlo Rainaldi, they were completed by Gian Lorenzo Bernini with the collaboration of Carlo Fontana. Rainaldi invested the best of his abilities into the design and construction of Santa Maria dei Miracoli. His task was to both inspire and impress travelers entering the city, drawing them across the square to the beauty of the churches beyond. His skill as urban planner was evident. As well as being elevated from the level of the square, the two churches emphasized the elegant lines of the Trident, Via del Babbuino, Via del Corso and Via di Ripetta, radiating out beyond, adding depth and perspective to the overall picture. The observer's attention however, is drawn to the square on the splendid façades and apparent striking symmetry of Santa Maria dei Miracoli and Santa Maria di Montesanto. He also used an element of illusion, as the churches, which appear so similar from a distance, are in fact charmingly individual. Constructing the churches' two façades was no mean feat, as their areas, differed in size, hindered the all important element of symmetry. The problem was overcome using differing dome dimensions. Santa Maria di Montesanto (having a smaller area) has an oval dome, whilst the larger Santa Maria dei Miracoli is circular. The impression from the square however, is of two identical domes. On July 15 1662, the first stone of Santa Maria di Montesanto was laid. After a brief interruption in 1673, construction was continued and completed under the guidance of Bernini and then Carlo Fontana. As both churches were designed with welcoming visitors in mind, their external qualities were prioritized. As well as being monumental scenery, the porticoes of the twin churches, touched with classicism, extended onto the square, breaking with the tradition of the Baroque style, heralding a new architectural age. Fusing the churches with the surrounding square, monuments and streets, creates an harmonious effect, in which one aspect of this body of space, cannot be separated from another. The Church of Santa Maria del Popolo (one of the three churches on the square), was built on the site where, according to tradition, the Emperor Nerowas buried. The church was constructed on request of and paid for by the Roman people (hence the name Saint Mary of the People). Legend tells how Nero's damned spirit was imprisoned in a walnut tree, which had grown above the spot where his body laid. The affrighted neighborhood requested that the tree be burnt down, and a church built there. Dedicated to the Virgin in 1099, it was perceived to have effectively exorcised the area of the ancient and untoward "presences" of demons, witches and uncanny nocturnal sightings of Nero's ghost. The clean simple lines of the Augustinian order in the church's façade was the work of Bernini. Inside are precious paintings by Pinturicchio, Annibale Carracci as well as Caravaggio's moving "Conversion of St Paul" and "Crucifixion of St Peter". Santa Maria del Popolo was the first church in Rome to have a dome with an octagonal tambour. Its brick bell tower in late-Gothic style, is unique too, with a clock, four small pinnacles and characteristic tiling. The Giacomo Acqua barracks, opposite Santa Maria del Popolo were added in the 1823; the small dome was designed to reflect the one of the ancient church, to maintain the square's symmetry. The bars and restaurants on the square are not as historic, as other places of the city, but they are an integral part of Piazza del Popolo, haunted throughout the years by figures dear to Rome, such as Trilussa, Guttuso and Pasolini.”
  • 183 locals recommend
Museum
“The Borghese Museum is probably the most elegant and refined museum in Rome. It is found inside Villa Borghese's park and with amazing pieces of art that vary from sculpture, to wall paintings and the museum beautiful architecture will make you fall in love with it. Since it is often fully booked it is better to do a reservation at least one week before you plan to go.”
  • 200 locals recommend
Exhibit
$$$
“Designed by controversial architect Zaha Hadid, the MAXXI is an unconventional space both inside and out. This striking building is composed of giant intersecting concrete segments that seem severe from the outside, but inside create flowing pathways that gently transport the visitor through this modern, open-plan space. The MAXXI hosts thought-provoking and colorful exhibitions from the modern art world.”
  • 136 locals recommend
Concert Hall
“If you love music, Auditorium is the place to go to enjoy a beautiful concert”
  • 155 locals recommend
Soccer Stadium
“Ok, we're still getting over the idea that Francesco Totti will not be playing for AS Roma anymore, but - if you like the atmosphere of a raucous and inflamed stadium - it's worth dropping by on match day to watch the gladiators in action.”
  • 135 locals recommend
Art Gallery
“The Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea, most popularly known simply as GNAM, is located ad No. 131 of Viale delle Belle Arti. Our guests can easily reach this museum with the tramway No. 19, which stops in Via Barletta, very close to the metro station of OTTAVIANO. The artworks inside the museum are exhibited in 75 halls. The museum displays about 1100 paintings and sculptures of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, of which it has the largest collection in Italy. Among the Italian artists represented are Giacomo Balla, Umberto Boccioni, Alberto Burri, Antonio Canova, Giorgio de Chirico, Lucio Fontana, Amedeo Modigliani. The museum also holds some works by foreign artists, among them Braque, Calder, Cézanne, Degas, Duchamp, Giacometti, Kandinsky, Mondrian, Monet, Jackson Pollock, Rodin, and Van Gogh. ”
  • 74 locals recommend
Monument / Landmark
“The "Pincio" is inside "Villa Borghese", one of the most important parks of Roma. You can relax inside the gardens, watch Roma from here and reach the museum Galleria Borghese which is inside this park”
  • 75 locals recommend
Zoo
“I suggest you to rent a car sharing, like enjoy.it, and go to the bioparco entrance. leave the car maybe then rent a bike for a ride. ”
  • 64 locals recommend
Bridge
“One the principal squares for night life. Here you can find bars, restaurants, pubs and a lot of people on the square chatting and having a drink.”
  • 100 locals recommend
Park
“Nice and big park. It has a bunker, built in the early 1940s to protect the King and Queen during the war.”
  • 98 locals recommend
Park
“Villa Torlonia, the most recent of the villas belonging to Rome’s nobility, still retains a particular fascination due to the originality of its English-style garden (one of the few examples in the city), and to the unexpectedly large number of buildings and garden furniture in the grounds. The attractions of the site are the Casino Nobile (the home of the Villa Museum and the collection of works by the Roman School), the Casino dei Principi (used for exhibitions and the home of the Roman School Archive), and the Museum of the Casina delle Civette.”
  • 80 locals recommend
Café
$
“This invigorating museum has two locations that expose you to the wild world of modern art. With acclaimed international artists, a café, restaurant, terrace, bookshop and art installations, both galleries are fast becoming creative public meeting places. The Spazio Area has wifi, international art magazines, newspapers and holds events and workshops with poets, artists and philosophers. The MACRO in the Spazio area used to be a Peroni beer factory, while MACRO Testaccio is a former slaughterhouse with pavilions built as far back as 1888.”
  • 48 locals recommend
Park
“Very nice and big park in Rome and in summer they organise concert open air.”
  • 22 locals recommend
Historic Site
“catacombs of the early Christian period (built between the second and fifth centuries after Christ) placed on the consular road of Salaria. Valuable stone paintings depicting the virgin with the prophets.”
  • 41 locals recommend
Italian Restaurant
$$
“Restaurant with the best view in town, especially in the night, romantic place”
  • 52 locals recommend

Top restaurants

Italian Restaurant
“Restaurant with the best view in town, especially in the night, romantic place”
  • 52 locals recommend
Pizza Place
“A two minute walk from our flat for one the traditional crispy, served on metal plate Roman pizzas. If you want a starter, go for the fried Suppli, Fiori di Zucca and Filetto di Baccala - respectively a fried rice ball, zucchini flowers with mozzarella and anchovies and cod fish. ”
  • 44 locals recommend
Italian Restaurant
“ your other “local”. No frills roman cuisine, cheap and easy. Go for classic Roman pastas (amatriciana, carbonara, gricia, cacio e pepe).”
  • 46 locals recommend
Roman Restaurant
“the real Roman cuisine in a traditional setting tavern recommended by guests”
  • 30 locals recommend
Diner
“A special Bistrot with a original simple and very tasty menu inspired by the mediterranean culture.”
  • 22 locals recommend
Diner
“A budget fiendly welcoming place, ideal for trying out Roman dishes and homely wines. ”
  • 22 locals recommend
Italian Restaurant
“Great restaurant. Real Sicilian specialities and atmosphere, both fish and meat. I would recommend the "Frittura primavera". To finish the meal ask for a "sgroppino". Very reasonable prices. ”
  • 23 locals recommend
Dessert Shop
“Dolce is a really nice place where it's possible to enjoy brunch, lunch dinner but also a break during the afternoon or after dinner. It's famous for its dessert (as the name of the restaurant suggest) and they make the dessert expressed (you can also watch them when they're making them) or you can make them!! It's possible also to eat meat, burgers, rolls, eggs, omelette, pancakes, salads and other food. The restaurant design is cool and modern!”
  • 25 locals recommend

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