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Explore North Hempstead

Parks & nature in North Hempstead

Garden
“My favorite Arboretum around here. There are so many, but this is the best. Amazing flower garden, coffee shop and trails. ”
5 locals recommend
Park
2 locals recommend
Playground
“Cunningham Park is a 358-acre (1.45 km2) park in the New York City borough of Queens. The park lies between the Grand Central Parkway to the south and the Long Island Expressway, and is bifurcated by the Clearview Expressway. The park is operated by the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation. The land for the park was acquired by the city starting in the 1920s, and was originally named Hillside Park. The park was renamed for New York City Comptroller W. Arthur Cunningham.[1] The Long Island Motor Parkway provides a bike path through Cunningham Park, west to Kissena Park and east to Alley Pond Park, part of the Brooklyn-Queens Greenway. Mountain biking trails run throughout northern”
9 locals recommend
Golf Course
“Huge park with many walking trails; a large dog park; a small duck pond; and veterans' memorials. ”
6 locals recommend
Park
“The Crocheron family lived on the edge of Little Neck Bay for centuries. The first family member to live in the area was John Crocheron, a farmer whose will dates from 1695. His long line of distinguished descendents include: Henry Crocheron, a Congressman from 1815 to 1817; Jacob Crocheron, a Congressman from 1829 to 1831; Nicholas Crocheron, a member of the 1854 State Assembly; and Joe Crocheron, a horse racer and gambler who was as renowned as Cornelius Vanderbilt and August Belmont. ”
7 locals recommend
Trail
“Need a nature walk? This is the perfect place while you experience The Gold Coast of a bygone era. Very popular with locals who want to unwind in a beautiful setting.”
2 locals recommend
Park
“This place has character with history about the mansion and there’s a bonus of gorgeous gardens blooming different types of flowers and plants. This place has been visited by different tourists. ”
6 locals recommend
Park
1 local recommends
Pool
“This is a beautiful and historic waterfront cover of Queens. It locates at the northwest cover of the juncture of Little Neck Bay and LI Sound, Fort Totten is a walk back in time. The property has water on 3 sides and is attached to Queens via the Cross Island Pkwy. It used to be inhabited by the IS Army as a fort. There are parade grounds on which summer concerts and soccer games are held.”
4 locals recommend
Park
“Two playgrounds, Golf Course, Mini Golf, Driving Range, Batting Cages, Indoor Swimming Pool and fitness center. ”
4 locals recommend
Other Great Outdoors
“A lovely park with nice trails throughout, views of the bay and the bridge, and picturesque fishing jetties.”
6 locals recommend
Park
“Every Sunday night in the summer they have free concerts. This is walking distance to our house. There is also a public beach, playground, and walking trails. ”
1 local recommends
Park
“Alley Pond Park is the second-largest public park in Queens, New York City. It occupies 655.294 acres (265.188 ha), most of it acquired and cleared by the city in 1929, as authorized by a resolution of the New York City Board of Estimate in 1927.[1] The park is bordered to the east by Douglaston, to the west by Bayside, to the north by Little Neck Bay, and to the south by Union Turnpike. It is run and operated by the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation. The park contains the Queens Giant, an old tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) that is the tallest carefully measured tree in New York City and probably the oldest living thing in the New York metropolitan area.[2] Cross Islan”
1 local recommends
Lake
“5 min walk to Oakland Lake. Oakland Lake is a 15,000-year-old spring-fed glacial kettle pond located in Alley Pond Park. The lake, once known as Mill Pond, became known as Oakland Lake, named for the 19th century estate on this site called “The Oaks” for the many oak trees in the area. Oakland Lake is fed by underground springs and a ravine, and at one time it was speculated that the lake was 600 feet deep and had a massive underground river leading to nearby Little Neck Bay. In 1969, a diving expedition went in search of the lake bottom, undergoing elaborate emergency prevention measures in case the alleged river’s current was too strong. However, the dive proved that the lake was only app”
4 locals recommend
Park
1 local recommends