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Top recommendations from locals

From sightseeing to hidden gems, find out what makes the city unique with the help of the locals who know it best.

Wine Bar
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“Wonder around the tiny streets or grab a drink during the afternoon and chill with a beautiful view to the Douro river. Lots of animation ”
  • 196 locals recommend
Bridge
“This bridge spans the river and is just iconic. Take a walk on the top part of the bridge for the best views.”
  • 141 locals recommend
  • 37 Experiences
Church
“The Porto Cathedral (Portuguese: Sé do Porto) is a Roman Catholic church located in the historical center of the city. It is one of the city's oldest monuments and one of the most important local Romanesque monuments. Unlike what's often written, the current Cathedral of Porto was not built under the patronage of Bishop Hugo since the pre-Romanesque church is still mentioned in the De Expugnatione Lyxbonensi as still extant in 1147. This means the present building was only started in the second half of the century and it would be constantly under works well until the 16th century (without counting later Baroque and 20th century interventions), but there is evidence that the city has been a bishopric seat since the Suevi domination in the 5th-6th centuries. The cathedral is flanked by two square towers, each supported with two buttresses and crowned with a cupola. The façade lacks decoration and is rather architecturally heterogeneous. It shows a Baroque porch and a beautiful Romanesque rose window under a crenelated arch, giving the impression of a fortified church. The Romanesque nave is rather narrow and is covered by barrel vaulting. It is flanked by two aisles with a lower vault. The stone roof of the central aisle is supported by flying buttresses, making the building one of the first in Portugal to use this architectonic feature. This first Romanesque building has suffered many alterations but the general aspect of the façade has remained romanesque. Inner view of rose window and central aisle of Porto Cathedral. Around 1333 the Gothic funerary chapel of João Gordo was added. João was a Knight Hospitaller who worked for King Dinis I. His tomb is decorated with his recumbent figure and reliefs of the Apostles. Also from the Gothic period is the elegant cloister, built between the 14th and the 15th centuries during the reign of King John I, who married English Princess Philippa of Lancaster in Porto Cathedral in 1387. Baroque loggia to the lateral façade The external appearance of the Cathedral was greatly altered during Baroque times. In 1772 a new main portal substituted the old Romanesque original and the tower cupolas were altered. In 1736 Italian architect Nicolau Nasoni added an elegant Baroque loggia to the lateral façade of the Cathedral. During the War of the Oranges whilst the battle at Amarante was taking place a group of Spanish soldiers briefly took control of the Cathedral before being overcome by the locals of the town. A marble plaque with a Magnetite backing now hangs up behind the altar in order to remind everyone of those who lost their lives whilst regaining control of the chapel. The magnetite backing was chosen in order to remind those traveling near the cathedral by interfering with the direction in which their compass points, Gothic cloisters of the Cathedral. The interior was also altered during the baroque era. In one of the chapels, there is a magnificent silver altarpiece, built in the second half of the 17th century by Portuguese artists. Also in the 17th century, the romanesque apse (which had an ambulatory) was torn down and a new one was built in baroque style, later decorated with new wall paintings by Nasoni and choir stalls. The altarpiece of the chapel, designed by Santos Pacheco and executed by Miguel Francisco da Silva between 1727 and 1729, is an important work of Portuguese Baroque. The three red marble holy-water fonts, supported by a statue, date from the 17th century. The baptistery contains a bronze bas-relief by António Teixeira Lopes, depicting the baptism of Christ by John the Baptist. The South transept arm gives access to the Gothic cloister, which is decorated with baroque azulejos by Valentim de Almeida (between 1729 and 1731).[3] They depict the life of the Virgin Mary and Ovid's Metamorphoses. The remains of the Early-Romanesque ambulatory contain a few sarcophagi. The terrace is decorated with tile panels by António Vidal. The coffered ceiling of the chapter house was painted with allegories of moral values by Pachini in 1737. Mass is celebrated at 11am each day.[2] ”
  • 113 locals recommend
  • 41 Experiences
Train Station
“Check out the interior decorative tiles, depicting scenes of life in Porto.”
  • 58 locals recommend
  • 3 Experiences
Neighbourhood
“Ribeira is one of the oldest and typical places of the city of Porto, Portugal. Located in the parish of São Nicolau, next to the Douro River, it is part of the Historic Center of Porto, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It is, at the moment, an area very frequented by tourists and place of concentration of bars and restaurants.”
  • 52 locals recommend
  • 85 Experiences
Church
“The city's most important Gothic temple, whose construction began in the fourteenth century. It is one of the most important works of the Baroque, by its gilded interior from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. It was the exuberance of its gild carved wood work that led Count Raczinsky to describe it as the 'Church of Gold'. And, overwhelmed, he adds: 'The gild of this church is so beautiful and rich that goes far beyond everything I have seen in Portugal and in the whole world'. It is worth of notice the Tree of Jesse, as well as the catacombs. It is a National Monument since 1910 and World Cultural Heritage by UNESCO since 1996.”
  • 87 locals recommend
  • 1 Experience
Palace
“This pompous 19th-century building with a vast Neoclassical façade is the former stock exchange that was built to impress and earn the credibility of European investors.”
  • 52 locals recommend
Theatre
“Originally called "Real Teatro de São João", its original construction was erected in 1794 by the determination of Francisco de Almada and Mendonça, with a project by the Italian architect Vicente Mazzoneschi, who had been the set designer of the Teatro de São Carlos in Lisboa.”
  • 52 locals recommend
Coffee Shop
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“Rua da Flores is certainly one of the most touristic streets in the city of Porto. It wasn’t always like this. This street, that crosses São Bento Station and São Domingos Square, was the old street of merchants and aristocrats. Crossing Rua das Flores is not always an easy task, given the amount of people entering and leaving the shops, grocery stores, and cafes, on the terraces. Until today, the street has maintained its original profile and architecture of the XVII, XVIII e XIX centuries, and this is where one of the most emblematic baroque façades of Porto can be seen, the Misericordia Church (1749-1750), rebuilt by the architect Nicolau Nasoni.”
  • 55 locals recommend
Palace
“This splendid neoclassical monument (built from 1842 to 1910) honours Porto’s past and present money merchants. Just past the entrance is the glass-domed Pátio das Nações (Hall of Nations), where the exchange once operated. But this pales in comparison with rooms deeper inside; to visit these, join one of the half-hour guided tours, which set off every 30 minutes. The highlight is a stupendous ballroom known as the Salão Árabe (Arabian Hall), with stucco walls that have been teased into complex Moorish designs, then gilded with some 18kg of gold.”
  • 84 locals recommend
  • 8 Experiences
Route
“Lots of cool bars, shops and a hip and happening place for young people, especially at night, close to Galerias de Paris, if you wanna go out at night, definitely stop by.”
  • 64 locals recommend
Tapas Restaurant
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“The Rua das Flores has long been the city's best street for opening a new business. And if it's a cool, well decorated, lively restaurant, then success is practically guaranteed. The long communal table does have a hint of the school canteen about it – but don't worry, this is not cafeteria food. Pretty much everything is good here: from appetisers such as smoked salmon and quail eggs to larger dishes (which you can share) such as the Lafões veal. The latter is one of this busy street's highlights. Tips: – The desserts here are among Porto's most creative. Order the biscuit cake, served by the centimetre. – The restrooms have a 6 and a 9 on the doors. Yeah, we're not sure either. ”
  • 38 locals recommend
Shopping Centre
“Great place for shopping with Special rates for tourists. Catch the metro and leave at "João de Deus" station. 7 minutes trip.”
  • 41 locals recommend
Route
“You can go by cable car from Vila Nova de Gaia to Cais de Gaia. It is near the river and ther are lots of restaurants, bares and shops.”
  • 72 locals recommend
Portuguese Restaurant
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“In terms of environment, the Cantinho do Avillez in Porto is also a friendly, welcoming and relaxed space. How could it not be, quality is a priority. As in the Cantinho de Lisboa, the cuisine is inspiring with influences of travel. The menu offers some of the Cantinho's successful dishes like the Peixinhos da Horta with Tartar Sauce; Scallops marinated with avocado; Sautéed Chicken Livers with onion compote and Port; Cod slivers, loose crumbs, BT egg and explosive olives; the Risotto Portobello mushrooms with smoked bacon, parmesan and basil; the Barrosa PDO burger with onions, foie gras and fries; the Hazel 3; ... ”
  • 31 locals recommend
Garden
“This beautiful park has several platforms of garden, all facing the river with astonishing views.”
  • 37 locals recommend