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Showing you results for "Southsea, Portsmouth"

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Parks & nature in Southsea

Park
“So much open space to have a picnic, relax or come to one of the many events hosted here”
8 locals recommend
Park
“Victoria Park is a public park located just to the north of Portsmouth Guildhall, adjacent to Portsmouth and Southsea railway station and close to the city centre in Portsmouth, Hampshire. It was officially opened on 25 May 1878 and was the first public park to be opened in Portsmouth. It was designed by Alexander McKenzie. It has a total area of around 15 acres (61,000 m2) and is planted with trees, shrubs and flowers. The centre of the park features an enclosed area which inhabits animals such as birds, rabbits and guinea pigs.”
5 locals recommend
Park
2 locals recommend
Lake
1 local recommends
Pool
“This beach is the nearest to the house, only 15 minutes walk South. It's good to swim and usually not busy. ”
2 locals recommend
Park
“Outdoor park with concrete rinks, ramps & rails, for skateboards, BMXs, scooters and roller blades. Mini-wheeler sessions. Roller Disco summer sessions with the best DJs and live music. There are helmets, skates, skateboards and a limited number of scooters available to hire at reasonable rates. Please note that they recommend all users to wear helmets and all under 16s must do so. The iconic image of the skatepark is the bandstand, situated in the centre of the skatepark and built in 1928 as a traditional bandstand, surrounded by grass. In the 1930s a paved area was laid around the bandstand for dancing and for roller skating, surrounded by a low fence. Southsea Skatepark is arguably the oldest skatepark in the World, with the current ‘rink’ area dating back to a roller rink that was first built back in the 1950s. Back in the 70s and 80s the rink was only used for roller hockey. The skatepark was remodelled in the 1970s with concrete (bowls, snakerun, etc) and then modified again in 1990 with a new bowl replacing the old reservoir. In the mid to late 90s the rink area was built on with new ledges, banks, rails and ramps and in the last ten years two new mini ramps and a replacement vert ramp have been built. "We’re possibly the oldest and most iconic Skatepark in the UK – and celebrated our 40th birthday last year! We open all year round and welcome everyone from beginners to pros. Since 2011, Southsea Skatepark has been run as a charity. Every penny we raise goes towards improving the park and it’s facilities." The skatepark periodically holds contests catering for BMX, inline, scooters and skateboarding. BMX shop on site. Southsea Skatepark reflects it’s age, mixing the legendary concrete from the 70s as one of the first skateparks in the UK , with the contemporary street/park section, which includes a state of the art vert ramp, spine mini, and a 4ft metal mini around by the cafe. Southsea Skatepark covers a range of styles, from the snake run bowl that encourages carving and creative lines to the pool slalom run bowl that has just had a small box jump added to the top of the run. Next there's the mogul and keyhole bowl that link together and have brought so much history to the park, it’s fair to say visitors come and go and respect anything done in the keyhole bowl which is approx 16ft deep. It definitely adds that legit tag to anything you can do in it. What was originally the banked freestyle kick turn area, has now had a state of the art 14ft high / 40ft wide vert ramp with skate lite surface added. Next to the vert (surrounding the iconic bandstand) there's a flat bank hip and pyramid grind rail that flows into a 4ft hip into the skate rink.”
2 locals recommend
Lake
“A few minutes walk from Southsea Studios is Canoe Lake. Fun for all guests. Pedal boats available for hire in the Summer months. Theres a nice cafe on the outskirts of the lake. Plenty of green areas for picnics and a childrens play area. ”
2 locals recommend
Lake
“CANOE LAKE AT SOUTHSEA SEAFRONT The open space containing Canoe Lake and the Rose Garden, is located on the seafront just to east of South Parade Pier, dates from 1886. The Canoe Lake area has a wide variety of landscapes ranging from the grassland area close to the lake, to the formal planting of the Rose Gardens within the remains of Lumps Fort. Canoe Lake was constructed from a remnant of the Great Morass, a large area of marshland that was centred north east of Southsea castle, the majority of the Great Morass was drained during the early 19th century. Canoe Lake was opened on 17th June 1886 by the Mayor, A.S. Blake, Esq and was initially used for sailing model yachts but was quickly ”
1 local recommends
Harbour / Marina
1 local recommends
Park
“On Southsea’s sunny seafront there’s a pretty spot with some compelling history. Actually, there are quite a few. Most of them are fairly well-known (no-one’s going to miss the Naval Memorial), but few Portsmuthians seem to be aware of Lumps Fort. Certainly, almost nobody knows it by that name. That’s because Lumps Fort doesn’t really exist anymore. The fortified walls remain, as well as a few mounts for defensive guns and the like. These days, however, the fort is better known for being the home of Southsea Rose Garden. The “current” fort was built in the mid-to-late 1800s, but it has been a fortification since at least as far back as 1805, possibly dating back centuries. Part of the semaphore line between London and HMNB Portsmouth ran through Lumps – but as a good chunk of the fort fell into the sea during this period, it doesn’t seem like it was particularly well-looked-after even then. The fort’s main claim to fame was serving as the training facility for Operation Frankton, where, in 1942, a team of Royal Marines executed a daring commando raid on the German-occupied port of Bordeaux. The mission led to six ships being successfully sabotaged, at the cost of the eventual deaths of all but two of the marines. A plaque outside Lumps Fort commemorates the “Cockleshell Heroes” (named after the “cockle” kayaks used) involved in this imaginative and courageous raid. A film of the same name was made in 1955. The majority of the old fort is now occupied by Southsea Rose Garden. In bloom, the garden is stunning, and is said to have up to forty varieties of roses on display. The Rose Garden also contains what seems to be the only clue that Portsmouth is twinned with the city of Maizuru, in Japan. The “Japanese Garden” might be a little dilapidated now, but it stills possesses a bit of the charm it must have had when it was new. While pretty, the Japanese Garden is fairly small, so when you’ve finished with it a brief stroll will lead you up a few steps and to the top of the fort’s walls, where, on a good day, you’ll get a fantastic view over the Solent to the Isle of Wight. The numerous memorials on the nearby benches suggest the views have made a similar impression on more than a few people. Once you’re had your fill of Lumps Fort and Nearby you’ll find Southsea Model Village, as well as Canoe Lake and Portsmouth’s own Natural History Museum, Cumberland House – all well worth a look.”
1 local recommends
Park
1 local recommends
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