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Top places of worship recommendations from locals

Church
“Ancient church/monastery which was restored recently (2014) to its former glory & still bares the french revolutionary troops' bullet holes in some of the paintings inside the church.”
  • 9 locals recommend
Church
“The construction dates to 1100, in Romanesque-style consisting of a main nave and bell tower. During 16th century, renovations were completed in the Renaissance-style, which completely modified it.”
  • 1 local recommends
Church
“De grote kerk in het centrum van Cabeceiras de basto, de 'Mosteiro de S. Miguel de Refojos 'is een bezoekje zeker waard! Prachtige kerk en ook de parken voor-en naast de kerk zijn leuk om te bezoeken. Op het plein voor de kerk zijn regelmatig activiteiten; kleinschalige beurzen, dorpsfeesten e.d.”
  • 2 locals recommend
Church
“Although we can date the foundation of the Church of Barrô back to the 12th century - as the private Church of Egas Moniz (1080-1146), the Schoolmaster and Governor of the first king of Portugal, D. Afonso Henriques, we know nothing about the time it was built or transformed, or if it was just a matter of giving continuity to a worship that was probably being practiced in an already existing temple. On the other hand, according to a different testimony by Pedro Gonçalves, the villa de Barriolo belonged entirely to the Monastery of Paço de Sousa (Penafiel). Therefore, there were many conflicting interests within this area (both from the church and territorial), although they all had a common link to the heritage of the Gascões lineage, to which Egas Moniz belonged. Here, on the banks of the Douro river, people believed that there were traces of a bridge commissioned by one of the royal Mafaldas. This tradition is echoed by the Vicar José Mendes de Azevedo, when he refers traces of pillars on both banks, namely on the opposite parish of Barqueiros. The parish Church was not the only religious centre in Barrô because, in the 17th century (in 1693) a group of nuns who took the Franciscan habit settled in the area; after this group had been extinct (in 1780) and the resisting nuns had been incorporated in the Convent of Stigmata, in Lamego, this became an important teaching centre during the 19th and 20th centuries. It was the Convent of Jesus-Mary-Joseph, referred to in 1758 as Claras urbanas.”
  • 1 local recommends
Shrine
“santuário mais importante do culto Mariano em Trás-os-Montes. Um miradouro espetacular a 777 metros de altitude”
  • 1 local recommends
Church
“The Church of São Domingos, was order, along with the convent with the same name, in the 15th century, at the behest of the religious of São Domingos of Guimarães. The architecture receives influences of two styles: The most obvious is the Romanesque, evident in the robustness and austerity of its lines, and the Gothic. In its facade we can see images of São Domingos and St. Francis of Assisi. In 1837 it suffered a major fire that wiped out most of the assets it held inside. The tower was added in the 18th century and the stained glass windows were placed during the last intervention works (2001-2005). It is open daily for worship.”
  • 1 local recommends
Church
“The Church of St. Peter is one of the best examples of religious baroque style in Vila Real. To the original building was built in 1528 and then various changes were introduced over time, until what we have today. Among these changes, mostly made in the 18th century (hence the Baroque style) are; the "azulejo" (tiles) in the main chapel; the introduction of panels on the roof and the construction of the facade. To the richness of the interior, we can add to the abundant decoration of the facade, with two imposing bell towers, making this Church the only example of this kind in the historic center of Vila Real.”
  • 1 local recommends
Cemetery
“The first references to this location date to the 11th century, and suggest a rural property of great dimensions, that were eventually fortified. During the Christian reconquest of the Iberian peninsula, this region of Chaves (Aquae Flaviae) and Santo Estêvão were part of the dowry of Teresa of Leon and Castile, when she married Count Henry of Burgundy in 1093. In 1129, the region of Chaves was retaken by Muslim forces, but reconquered by Rui and Garcia Lopes in 1160, two brother-knights who offered their services to the first Portuguese king, Afonso I (1112-1185). The construction of this castle began during his reign and continued with his son and successor Sancho I (1185-1211). The strategic position of Castile, Portugal and this castle determined that the two kingdoms would use it to maintain contacts between them, from as early as 1253 when D. Afonso III came to Santo Estevão, to receive his future wife, Infanta D. Beatriz, daughter of Alfonso X of Leon and Castile. This medieval castle's use in wars was ended shortly after the sixteenth century and was subsequently converted into a rectory. It was classified as National Monument in 1939 and in 1951, it was transferred to the Portuguese State.”
  • 1 local recommends
Church
“A Igreja de Soalhães teve a sua origem num mosteiro do século XII, e foi sede do poder religioso num território muito importante e cobiçado pela nobreza medieval. No século XVIII, a igreja sofreu uma profunda transformação, adquirindo um interior profusamente decorado ao estilo barroco, onde reinam a talha dourada e os painéis de azulejo. Este é um dos mais belos monumentos e recantos da Rota do Românico no Vale do Tâmega e que vale a pena ser visitado. ”
  • 1 local recommends
Church
“Rota do Romanico. Roman route, can be reached on foot, from home to this Roman church.”
  • 1 local recommends
Church
  • 1 local recommends
Place of Worship
“Like many buildings belonging to monastic orders, so too the Church of the Savior of Lufrei was built in a fertile valley near the confluence of two small streams. This temple is a testament to the Romance of resistance like others of this region. Free of decorative carved details, the Church of Lufrei is only illuminated by narrow crevices positioned at key points of the building: above main portal and above the transept and just one in each section of the nave. The corbels of quadrangular profile are smooth, testimony of the late construction, as well as the arrangement of the portals, that are inserted in the wall's thickness, without columns or tympanum. Inside there are few traces, of the Romanesque, visible. We just feel the spirit of the Romanesque in this church through the crevices that illuminate the space in a tenuous way or by the dimension of the triumphal arch that closes down on the intimate chapel. On the North wall of the nave we point out the fresco of St. Andrew, accompanied by a inscription that says 1608.”
  • 1 local recommends