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Top park recommendations from locals

Zoo
“This place is super fun for adults and kids. HIGHLY recommend you pay a visit there. ”
  • 6 locals recommend
Travel Agency
“This should be your first stop! And it is right past the bridge over Duck Creek, Rt. 2 and Rt. 45”
  • 2 locals recommend
Park
“Tour a working rehab center for wildlife. They have permanent animals that can not be released due to injury. All donations go to help rescuing wildlife with the goal of release. ”
  • 1 local recommends
Park
“If you want to get back into the nature scene, this is the place to go. Hike all day, just soak it all in. ”
  • 1 local recommends
Dog Run
“This is a park designed and only for your dogs to romp around and play. Great addition to Minocqua. Behind Walmart”
  • 1 local recommends
Park
“Anvil Lake Trail features a large, mature contiguous block of northern hardwood forest with inclusions of hemlock and scattered mature hemlock nearly throughout. Other natural communities are northern wet forest and soft-water springs. Hemlock regeneration is significant. On nearly level topography to hummocky with steep slopes, a large majority of forest is dominated by sugar maple with sizable stands dominated by white pine, hemlock, red oak, or older aspen. The pines date from 1888 and some hemlock is older. The best stands have many large hardwoods and hemlock in the 22-28 inch diameter range. Super-canopy white pine is also present through much of the site. Yellow birch and basswood are also common. The understory varies from open and park-like to dense hazelnut thickets. A number of large snags and tip-ups are common and coarse woody debris is occasional. The groundlayer supports Canada mayflower, intermediate wood fern, lycopods, and rough-leaved rice cut grass. Birds include veery, pine siskin, evening grosbeak, ruby-crowned kinglet, Nashville warbler, black-throated blue warbler, and yellow-bellied flycatcher. Numerous trees of all types and size classes, large snags, and the open character of the understory contribute to the developing old growth structure of this site. Anvil Lake Trail is owned by the US Forest Service and was designated a State Natural Area in 2007.”
  • 1 local recommends
Park
“A great park downtown for swimming, tennis, bands in summer and the huge playground for the children”
  • 2 locals recommend
Park
“This great hiking area is managed by the Nature Conservancy and can be accessed by paddling across the lake, docking at the boat landing, and finding the trailhead across the road. Beautiful!”
  • 1 local recommends
Campground
  • 1 local recommends
Park
“Awesome mountain biking in the spring/summer/fall and beautiful trails for skate and classic skiing, and amazing groomed snowshoe and traditional as well. Very well-maintained! WinManTrails.com”
  • 1 local recommends
Park
“Biking and hiking, as well as winter snowshoeing and cross country skiing. Stop for a hand-dipped ice cream at the nearby Corner Store or rent a bike to hop on the miles and miles of bike trails which branch off from here and connect multiple Vilas County townships. You can also rent paddleboards, kayaks, and bikes at the Corner Store.”
  • 1 local recommends
Park
“Beautiful old growth forest for hiking and birdwatching (but be prepared, mosquitos are notoriously bad here). ”
  • 1 local recommends
Park
“You can choose a 1 mile or 2 mile hike on a peninsula of this beautiful clear lake. ”
  • 1 local recommends
Campground
“Beautiful secluded lake with great easy hiking trail and awesome beach. Check it out near sunset!”
  • 1 local recommends
Park
“Description The primary features of Franklin-Butternut Lakes are a number of small undeveloped lakes and several old-growth hemlock-hardwood stands in a hummocky pitted outwash terrain. The lakes are mostly of the soft water seepage type and range from Sunfish Lake, with its sandy bottom and sterile rosette flora, to a string of bog lakes on the north side of Franklin Lake. Included in the complex is the Bose Lake Hemlock-Hardwoods Research Natural Area, a fine old-growth stand with no evidence of cutting. Mature hemlock, sugar maple, yellow birch, and basswood dominate the forest with paper birch, balsam fir, and red maple are among the other trees present. The forest floor has an accumulation of fallen trees, tip-up mounds, and many cradle knolls. A relatively recent blowdown occurred on the south end of the stand with many large trees on the ground, all of which fell in an ENE direction. The resulting canopy gaps are filled with sugar maple seedlings and saplings. Characteristic groundlayer species are intermediate wood fern, wild sarsaparilla, large leaved aster, Canada mayflower, and club-mosses. Two rare lichens that require old-growth conditions have been found here. Several interconnected stands of hemlock-dominated old growth are on the isthmus between Franklin and Butternut Lakes. The Franklin Nature Trail winds through a portion of them. Smaller stands of old growth hemlock are found on the east side of Sunfish Lake, on the landward end of the sand spit on the north side of Franklin Lake, and on a long esker-like ridge in the vicinity of Two Dutchmen Lake. A few small stands of mature red and white pine occur on the dryer sandy loam soils, while most of the better hardwood and hemlock stands are on silt loams. The hardwood stands are generally sugar maple-dominated with yellow birch, basswood, and white ash as common associates. Bogs, black spruce-tamarack swamps, and small areas of bluejoint grass occupy the lowlands. Ecological gradients, for the most part, are intact. North of Franklin Lake, separated from the main body of the complex, is an area of bogs, bog lakes, and associated conifer swamps set in sandy, cut-over uplands with occasional intact groves of hemlock and red and white pine. Many of the wetland types here are of very good quality. A sand spit anchored by alder and red maple extends far out into Franklin Lake. The lakeshore to the north of the sand spit consists of a long beach ridge and a narrow damp swale supporting mature white pine with royal fern beneath. The lakeward side of the beach ridge is bordered by alder grading to a large floating sedge mat with a good mix of species. The numerous large old trees and snags situated near lakeshores provide important nesting sites for bald eagles and the lakes see much use by common loons. Other characteristic birds include blackburnian and black throated green warblers, red breasted nuthatch, winter wren, and pileated woodpecker. Originally designated as the 25-acre Bose Lake State Natural Area in 1974, Franklin and Butternut Lakes is owned by the U.S. Forest Service and was expanded in 2007. This site is also recognized by the Forest Service as an established Research Natural Area.”
  • 1 local recommends