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Hammamet an Tunisia’s Travel guidebook

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Hammamet an Tunisia’s Travel guidebook

Hammamet, Tunisia Holiday guide
We tried to gather all attractions, restaurants and best places to visit during you holiday in Hammamet and Tunisia
This place is very nice to visit. it is not the original medina but actually an artificial mimic of it. it has an attraction parc that you can enjoy and an aqua parc really nice to try. you can also find some shops there but be aware of their high prices. try to negotiate a lot if you really want to buy something. or just ask about the prices and only buy from places where prices are fixed and written on the products
Medina Mediterrane
This place is very nice to visit. it is not the original medina but actually an artificial mimic of it. it has an attraction parc that you can enjoy and an aqua parc really nice to try. you can also find some shops there but be aware of their high prices. try to negotiate a lot if you really want to buy something. or just ask about the prices and only buy from places where prices are fixed and written on the products
The castle of Hammamet or the Medina is the old city of Hammamet where people used to live in the old times. Now while having a tour in this beautiful place you will get to see the small very close each other houses of the ancient city. the tour inside the castle is very nice. you can also find some shops selling antics
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locals recommend
Hammamet
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locals recommend
The castle of Hammamet or the Medina is the old city of Hammamet where people used to live in the old times. Now while having a tour in this beautiful place you will get to see the small very close each other houses of the ancient city. the tour inside the castle is very nice. you can also find some shops selling antics
Carthage was the center or capital city of the ancient Carthaginian civilization, on the eastern side of the Lake of Tunis in what is now the Tunis Governorate in Tunisia. if you are visiting Tunis you need to go check this place it is now the old city where you can go and examine the historical remains of the old civilisations of Tunisia
12
locals recommend
Carthage
12
locals recommend
Carthage was the center or capital city of the ancient Carthaginian civilization, on the eastern side of the Lake of Tunis in what is now the Tunis Governorate in Tunisia. if you are visiting Tunis you need to go check this place it is now the old city where you can go and examine the historical remains of the old civilisations of Tunisia
What to Do For many visitors, the most rewarding way to spend time in Sidi Bou Said is simply to stroll through the Old Town, exploring winding side streets and stopping to explore the town's art galleries, studios, and restaurants at leisure. The sidewalks are lined with stalls, whose wares include hand-crafted souvenirs and bottles of fragrant jasmine. Make sure that your wanderings take you up to the lighthouse, where spectacular Gulf of Tunis views awaits. When you tire of walking, pay a visit to the home of Baron Rodolphe d'Erlanger. Named Ennejma Ezzahra, or Sparkling Star, the palace is a testament to the baron's love of Arabic culture. Its Neo-Moorish architecture honors the age-old building techniques of Arabia and Andalucia, with a beautiful arched doorway and stunning examples of artisan wood carving, plasterwork, and mosaic tiling. The musicologist's legacy can also be explored at the Centre des Musiques Arabes et Méditerranéennes. After a busy day spent exploring the town, return for a traditional hammam and massage. Where to Eat When it comes to restaurants, you're spoiled for choice — whether you're looking for a fine-dining experience or a cheap bite in an authentic café. For the former, try Au Bon Vieux Temps, a romantic garden restaurant with a mouthwatering menu featuring the Mediterranean and Tunisian classics. The food is complemented by mesmerizing ocean views and attentive service, and the wine list offers the chance to try regional Tunisian vintages. If you're thirsty rather than hungry, head to Café des Nattes, a Sidi Bou Said landmark loved by locals and tourists alike for its mint tea, Arabic coffee, and shisha pipes. Getting There If you're traveling to Tunisia as part of a tour, it's highly likely that Sidi Bou Said will be one of your planned stops. In this case, you'll probably arrive on a tour bus and won't have to worry too much about how to get there. However, those that plan on exploring independently will find it equally easy to reach the town either in a hire car, a taxi or with the help of public transport. Sidi Bou Said is connected to central Tunis by a regular commuter train, known as the TGM. The journey takes approximately 35 minutes. Those with reduced mobility should be aware that it's a steep walk from the train station to the heart of the Old Town
46
locals recommend
Sidi Bou Said
46
locals recommend
What to Do For many visitors, the most rewarding way to spend time in Sidi Bou Said is simply to stroll through the Old Town, exploring winding side streets and stopping to explore the town's art galleries, studios, and restaurants at leisure. The sidewalks are lined with stalls, whose wares include hand-crafted souvenirs and bottles of fragrant jasmine. Make sure that your wanderings take you up to the lighthouse, where spectacular Gulf of Tunis views awaits. When you tire of walking, pay a visit to the home of Baron Rodolphe d'Erlanger. Named Ennejma Ezzahra, or Sparkling Star, the palace is a testament to the baron's love of Arabic culture. Its Neo-Moorish architecture honors the age-old building techniques of Arabia and Andalucia, with a beautiful arched doorway and stunning examples of artisan wood carving, plasterwork, and mosaic tiling. The musicologist's legacy can also be explored at the Centre des Musiques Arabes et Méditerranéennes. After a busy day spent exploring the town, return for a traditional hammam and massage. Where to Eat When it comes to restaurants, you're spoiled for choice — whether you're looking for a fine-dining experience or a cheap bite in an authentic café. For the former, try Au Bon Vieux Temps, a romantic garden restaurant with a mouthwatering menu featuring the Mediterranean and Tunisian classics. The food is complemented by mesmerizing ocean views and attentive service, and the wine list offers the chance to try regional Tunisian vintages. If you're thirsty rather than hungry, head to Café des Nattes, a Sidi Bou Said landmark loved by locals and tourists alike for its mint tea, Arabic coffee, and shisha pipes. Getting There If you're traveling to Tunisia as part of a tour, it's highly likely that Sidi Bou Said will be one of your planned stops. In this case, you'll probably arrive on a tour bus and won't have to worry too much about how to get there. However, those that plan on exploring independently will find it equally easy to reach the town either in a hire car, a taxi or with the help of public transport. Sidi Bou Said is connected to central Tunis by a regular commuter train, known as the TGM. The journey takes approximately 35 minutes. Those with reduced mobility should be aware that it's a steep walk from the train station to the heart of the Old Town
n the early 20th century, Hammamet became the favourite haunt of artists, aristocrats and politicians including Winston Churchill, who worked on his memoirs here. This is largely due to George Sebastian, a Romanian millionaire who liked it so much that he decided to make it his home. He built a magnificent villa, now the International Cultural Centre set in a beautiful park. George Sebastian used it to entertain many writers and artist, including Andre Gide. Word spread and he was soon not the only foreign resident. The town also lured the American couple John and Violet Henson and their house became a meeting place for the artistic elite from all over the world.
Dar Sebastien - International Cultural Center of Hammamet
n the early 20th century, Hammamet became the favourite haunt of artists, aristocrats and politicians including Winston Churchill, who worked on his memoirs here. This is largely due to George Sebastian, a Romanian millionaire who liked it so much that he decided to make it his home. He built a magnificent villa, now the International Cultural Centre set in a beautiful park. George Sebastian used it to entertain many writers and artist, including Andre Gide. Word spread and he was soon not the only foreign resident. The town also lured the American couple John and Violet Henson and their house became a meeting place for the artistic elite from all over the world.