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Peter’s guidebook

Peter

Peter’s guidebook

Sightseeing
Take a little walk to this authentic Windmill in typical Dutch Landscape
At walking distance (10 minutes) you can have a look at the Spengense Molen (Authentic Dutch Windmill). The current mill is build after the burning down of the predecessor. After a failed experiment with a direct-driven internal paddle wheel, the mill was rebuilt in 1852 to its current form. Until 1962 this mill was used to regulate the water levels in the area. Dirk Blom was the miller from 1915 till 1960. Since 1963 the mill is owned by the organization "De Utrechtse Molens". The mill underwent a major restoration during 1985 and 1986. The mill was also jacked and adjusted straight. Until that major restauration some elements of the initial design have been put back, for example they replaced the equator by an catch construction. Draining the 1150 hectare polder became an ever greater problem after 1965 due to the lowering of the water level, combined with the settling of the peat soil. This greatly reduced reach of the scoop wheel. Around 1980 there was only 20 cm left. In 2011 the water axis was lowered 32 centimeter and the diameter of the scoop wheel increased to 46 cm. At the same time, the blades were narrowed from 52 to 33 cm. The slope has been adjusted also. With those modifications one was able to lower the reach to 70 cm. After decades of worrying, the grindle paddle wheel was able to function again. Most of the Saturdays this mill is in operation (it is turning but not pumping up the water). One could visit on Saturdays or there is the opportunity to make an appointment for a visit.
Spengense molen
72 Wagendijk
At walking distance (10 minutes) you can have a look at the Spengense Molen (Authentic Dutch Windmill). The current mill is build after the burning down of the predecessor. After a failed experiment with a direct-driven internal paddle wheel, the mill was rebuilt in 1852 to its current form. Until 1962 this mill was used to regulate the water levels in the area. Dirk Blom was the miller from 1915 till 1960. Since 1963 the mill is owned by the organization "De Utrechtse Molens". The mill underwent a major restoration during 1985 and 1986. The mill was also jacked and adjusted straight. Until that major restauration some elements of the initial design have been put back, for example they replaced the equator by an catch construction. Draining the 1150 hectare polder became an ever greater problem after 1965 due to the lowering of the water level, combined with the settling of the peat soil. This greatly reduced reach of the scoop wheel. Around 1980 there was only 20 cm left. In 2011 the water axis was lowered 32 centimeter and the diameter of the scoop wheel increased to 46 cm. At the same time, the blades were narrowed from 52 to 33 cm. The slope has been adjusted also. With those modifications one was able to lower the reach to 70 cm. After decades of worrying, the grindle paddle wheel was able to function again. Most of the Saturdays this mill is in operation (it is turning but not pumping up the water). One could visit on Saturdays or there is the opportunity to make an appointment for a visit.
A remarkable defensive ring made up of 46 forts and batteries as well as a multitude of dikes and sluices encircles the Dutch capital of Amsterdam. It’s the Defence Line (or ‘Stelling’) of Amsterdam. A Dutch historical monument, the Defence Line is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site since 1996. A large portion of this monument is open to the public and makes for a great day out for people young and old. Look at the defense line on google maps where you can spot the 46 forts around Amsterdam https://www.stellingvanamsterdam.nl/en/discover/defence-line-on-the-map
Fort bij Uithoorn
31 Mijdrechtse Zuwe
A remarkable defensive ring made up of 46 forts and batteries as well as a multitude of dikes and sluices encircles the Dutch capital of Amsterdam. It’s the Defence Line (or ‘Stelling’) of Amsterdam. A Dutch historical monument, the Defence Line is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site since 1996. A large portion of this monument is open to the public and makes for a great day out for people young and old. Look at the defense line on google maps where you can spot the 46 forts around Amsterdam https://www.stellingvanamsterdam.nl/en/discover/defence-line-on-the-map
The GOUDA CHEESE MARKET is a spectacular historic and nostalgic scene. Gouda is about 30 minutes drive by car. Weekly on Thursday, starting from Apr 4, 2019, until Aug 29, 2019 Not on 30 May Start time: 10:00 - End time: 12:30 The GOUDA CHEESE MARKET is a spectacular historic and nostalgic scene. If you would like to visit the cheese market, make sure you are on time. In good weather, the event at the Markt attracts many visitors. The traditional cheese market takes place every Thursday morning from 10.00 to 12.30 hrs, during the period from 4 April to 29 August (except on Ascension Day, 30 May). As in past times, the farmers and traders seal their bargains for the best cheeses through clapping hands. Besides the world-renowned cheese, you can also shop at the stalls filled with regional products. Besides the cheese trade and making of cheese, there is also a crafts market (from 28 June). There is also plenty to do in Gouda in the afternoons. For example, you can go on a boat trip through the canals or join the Gouda Guides Guild. At Syrup Waffles Bakery Van Vliet you can take part in a syrup waffle baking workshop. Or do the Beer-Wine-Cheese battle at Museumhavencafe/IJsselhuis and discover which combination tastes best. Go to the Event Calendar at welkcometogouda.com for the full programme, or go to VVV Gouda in the Goudse Waag for more information and fees. Every Thursday Gouda activities: - Gouds Holland Classic Fietstour | 13.00 uur | 150-180 min | €30,- - Syrup Waffle Factory | 10.00 uur - 17.00 uur | 60 min | €8,95 - *Walking tour with guide | Goudse Gidsen Gilde | 13.00 uur | 90 min | €4,- - Punselie Cookie Company (11 apr, 2, 9 + 16 may, 6 + 20 jun, 4 + 18 jul | 9.30 uur - 12.00 uur | 30 min | €7,80 - *Boat tour Gouda canals | 13.30 uur & 15.30 uur | 90 min | €10 - *Workshop bake your own syrup waffle | 15.00 uur | 45 min | €5,75 - Beer, wine en cheese battle | 15.30 uur | 75 min | €18,50 - Museum Gouda | 'Gouda Cheese' | 11.00 uur - 17.00 uur | € 11 - *Gouda Cheese Express Tour | jul+ aug | tot 12.30 uur/ 20 min | €7,50 - Gouda tour by bike taxi | €17,50 | 30 min | Opstappen bij De Waag *Information and tickets available at the tourist office.
7
locals recommend
GOUDA CHEESE MARKET
35 Markt
7
locals recommend
The GOUDA CHEESE MARKET is a spectacular historic and nostalgic scene. Gouda is about 30 minutes drive by car. Weekly on Thursday, starting from Apr 4, 2019, until Aug 29, 2019 Not on 30 May Start time: 10:00 - End time: 12:30 The GOUDA CHEESE MARKET is a spectacular historic and nostalgic scene. If you would like to visit the cheese market, make sure you are on time. In good weather, the event at the Markt attracts many visitors. The traditional cheese market takes place every Thursday morning from 10.00 to 12.30 hrs, during the period from 4 April to 29 August (except on Ascension Day, 30 May). As in past times, the farmers and traders seal their bargains for the best cheeses through clapping hands. Besides the world-renowned cheese, you can also shop at the stalls filled with regional products. Besides the cheese trade and making of cheese, there is also a crafts market (from 28 June). There is also plenty to do in Gouda in the afternoons. For example, you can go on a boat trip through the canals or join the Gouda Guides Guild. At Syrup Waffles Bakery Van Vliet you can take part in a syrup waffle baking workshop. Or do the Beer-Wine-Cheese battle at Museumhavencafe/IJsselhuis and discover which combination tastes best. Go to the Event Calendar at welkcometogouda.com for the full programme, or go to VVV Gouda in the Goudse Waag for more information and fees. Every Thursday Gouda activities: - Gouds Holland Classic Fietstour | 13.00 uur | 150-180 min | €30,- - Syrup Waffle Factory | 10.00 uur - 17.00 uur | 60 min | €8,95 - *Walking tour with guide | Goudse Gidsen Gilde | 13.00 uur | 90 min | €4,- - Punselie Cookie Company (11 apr, 2, 9 + 16 may, 6 + 20 jun, 4 + 18 jul | 9.30 uur - 12.00 uur | 30 min | €7,80 - *Boat tour Gouda canals | 13.30 uur & 15.30 uur | 90 min | €10 - *Workshop bake your own syrup waffle | 15.00 uur | 45 min | €5,75 - Beer, wine en cheese battle | 15.30 uur | 75 min | €18,50 - Museum Gouda | 'Gouda Cheese' | 11.00 uur - 17.00 uur | € 11 - *Gouda Cheese Express Tour | jul+ aug | tot 12.30 uur/ 20 min | €7,50 - Gouda tour by bike taxi | €17,50 | 30 min | Opstappen bij De Waag *Information and tickets available at the tourist office.
8 kilometers from our caravan you can find Castle De Haar. It is a nice area to cycle through and to visit also. To visit De Haar Castle, whether to admire its park, its rich history, the exhibitions, gardens, deer or for a wedding, is to be immersed in a different world. Behind every door, every detail, every flower in its colourful gardens is a story. A story about earlier times, different cultures and interesting characters. De Haar is the largest castle in the Netherlands, once the private residence of the Van Zuylen family, whose descendants still stay here yearly. In the last century, the castle also frequently hosted members of the international jet set with their lavish lifestyle; from Coco Chanel to Roger Moore, they too left their mark on the sumptuous rooms of the most opulent spot in Utrecht. Few castles in The Netherlands can equal De Haar for its ideal image of a medieval fortress with towers and ramparts, moats, gates and drawbridges. Like a real fairy-tale castle it rises majestically from parkland with impressive trees, old gardens and ponds. The castle is situated in the centre of The Netherlands, near Utrecht, and is easy to reach by car. There is ample parking space. De Haar Castle ranks among the top twenty most visited Dutch museums. It is a historic monument alive with year-round activities such as guided tours (for adults and for children), exhibitions, theatre and events. De Haar Castle is a private foundation and does not receive any regular subsidies from local or central government. The foundation is a non-profit organisation and depends entirely on its revenues from ticket sales, activities and events. For over a century it has been tradition for the Van Zuylen van Nijevelt van de Haar family to reside in the castle for one month a year, in September. The tradition centres around entertaining prominent international guests at lavish house parties hosted by the baron and baroness. Famous guests included Coco Chanel, Maria Callas, Gregory Peck, Roger Moore, Yves Saint Laurent, Joan Collins and Brigitte Bardot. The medieval House De Haar dates from the 13th century. It fell into disrepair in the 18th and 19th centuries. Architect Pierre Cuypers (famous for his designs of the Rijksmuseum and the Central Station in Amsterdam) restored and rebuilt De Haar for baron Etienne van Zuylen van Nijevelt van de Haar. The rebuilding took from 1892 till 1912 and was a project unique of its kind in all of Europe. Cuypers’ grand design included not just the architecture of the castle but also the interiors, the gardens, the chapel and even the village of Haarzuilens. Without exaggeration the whole can be described as a Gesamtkunstwerk. Cuypers has created a unique, special world: an enchanting oasis of harmony and peace. The park and gardens surrounding De Haar Castle – covering over 135 acres of land – are worth a visit in their own right. The Rose Garden, the Roman Garden, the ponds and canals, as well as the many bridges, romantic vistas and impressive avenues invite visitors to go on long walks or have a picnic. Each season in the park has its own charm.
47
locals recommend
Castle De Haar
1 Kasteellaan
47
locals recommend
8 kilometers from our caravan you can find Castle De Haar. It is a nice area to cycle through and to visit also. To visit De Haar Castle, whether to admire its park, its rich history, the exhibitions, gardens, deer or for a wedding, is to be immersed in a different world. Behind every door, every detail, every flower in its colourful gardens is a story. A story about earlier times, different cultures and interesting characters. De Haar is the largest castle in the Netherlands, once the private residence of the Van Zuylen family, whose descendants still stay here yearly. In the last century, the castle also frequently hosted members of the international jet set with their lavish lifestyle; from Coco Chanel to Roger Moore, they too left their mark on the sumptuous rooms of the most opulent spot in Utrecht. Few castles in The Netherlands can equal De Haar for its ideal image of a medieval fortress with towers and ramparts, moats, gates and drawbridges. Like a real fairy-tale castle it rises majestically from parkland with impressive trees, old gardens and ponds. The castle is situated in the centre of The Netherlands, near Utrecht, and is easy to reach by car. There is ample parking space. De Haar Castle ranks among the top twenty most visited Dutch museums. It is a historic monument alive with year-round activities such as guided tours (for adults and for children), exhibitions, theatre and events. De Haar Castle is a private foundation and does not receive any regular subsidies from local or central government. The foundation is a non-profit organisation and depends entirely on its revenues from ticket sales, activities and events. For over a century it has been tradition for the Van Zuylen van Nijevelt van de Haar family to reside in the castle for one month a year, in September. The tradition centres around entertaining prominent international guests at lavish house parties hosted by the baron and baroness. Famous guests included Coco Chanel, Maria Callas, Gregory Peck, Roger Moore, Yves Saint Laurent, Joan Collins and Brigitte Bardot. The medieval House De Haar dates from the 13th century. It fell into disrepair in the 18th and 19th centuries. Architect Pierre Cuypers (famous for his designs of the Rijksmuseum and the Central Station in Amsterdam) restored and rebuilt De Haar for baron Etienne van Zuylen van Nijevelt van de Haar. The rebuilding took from 1892 till 1912 and was a project unique of its kind in all of Europe. Cuypers’ grand design included not just the architecture of the castle but also the interiors, the gardens, the chapel and even the village of Haarzuilens. Without exaggeration the whole can be described as a Gesamtkunstwerk. Cuypers has created a unique, special world: an enchanting oasis of harmony and peace. The park and gardens surrounding De Haar Castle – covering over 135 acres of land – are worth a visit in their own right. The Rose Garden, the Roman Garden, the ponds and canals, as well as the many bridges, romantic vistas and impressive avenues invite visitors to go on long walks or have a picnic. Each season in the park has its own charm.
Have a city walk through the city center of Amsterdam. There are so many activities you could do, and this is defenitely one of them. Check more at www.iamsterdam.com/en
285
locals recommend
De Wallen
285
locals recommend
Have a city walk through the city center of Amsterdam. There are so many activities you could do, and this is defenitely one of them. Check more at www.iamsterdam.com/en
The Heineken Experience, is a fun and light experience. It was formerly called the Heineken Museum, but they have been able to modernize it and blend a nice piece of history with a fun experience. One of the must-do's in Amsterdam https://www.heineken.com/us/agegateway?returnurl=%2fheineken-experience
422
locals recommend
Heineken Experience
78 Stadhouderskade
422
locals recommend
The Heineken Experience, is a fun and light experience. It was formerly called the Heineken Museum, but they have been able to modernize it and blend a nice piece of history with a fun experience. One of the must-do's in Amsterdam https://www.heineken.com/us/agegateway?returnurl=%2fheineken-experience
Love paintings? Love History? Take the train from Breukelen station (5km from our caravan) and visit Amsterdam. Long Live Rembrandt More than 8,000 people in 95 countries responded to our open call to submit self-made artworks inspired by Rembrandt. An expert panel of judges selected 575 works made by a total of 693 people for inclusion in the Long Live Rembrandt exhibition. The themes of the exhibition emerged from similarities between works made by the many different artists. These themes include ‘The Night Watch’, ‘Portraits in the style of Rembrandt’ and ‘Rembrandt the storyteller’. Pieter Roelofs, chair of the panel of judges and head of painting and sculpture at the Rijksmuseum: The infectious creativity of the artists and the sheer variety of submissions has made the selection and curation of this exhibition an absolute joy. In Long Live Rembrandt we see the master through the eyes of the artists. This exhibition is not just about Rembrandt, it’s about us all.
1352
locals recommend
Rijksmuseum
1 Museumstraat
1352
locals recommend
Love paintings? Love History? Take the train from Breukelen station (5km from our caravan) and visit Amsterdam. Long Live Rembrandt More than 8,000 people in 95 countries responded to our open call to submit self-made artworks inspired by Rembrandt. An expert panel of judges selected 575 works made by a total of 693 people for inclusion in the Long Live Rembrandt exhibition. The themes of the exhibition emerged from similarities between works made by the many different artists. These themes include ‘The Night Watch’, ‘Portraits in the style of Rembrandt’ and ‘Rembrandt the storyteller’. Pieter Roelofs, chair of the panel of judges and head of painting and sculpture at the Rijksmuseum: The infectious creativity of the artists and the sheer variety of submissions has made the selection and curation of this exhibition an absolute joy. In Long Live Rembrandt we see the master through the eyes of the artists. This exhibition is not just about Rembrandt, it’s about us all.
Take the train to Amsterdam (from Breukelen train station) and visit the Van Gogh Museum Meet Vincent The painter of Sunflowers According to Vincent van Gogh, his paintings of sunflowers were among the best works he ever made. But how did he become the painter of Sunflowers? READ FULL STORY Nowadays Vincent van Gogh is known as the man who painted Sunflowers. He painted sunflowers as no one before him had ever done. Vincent didn't always paint in the bright he's now so famous for. So, how did he come to create his masterpiece? From a single sunflower to a vase full of them Vincent began painting a single sunflower in a vegetable garden, and ended up with a work that became world-famous. There were just two years in between the two works, during which he underwent rapid artistic development The first sunflowers Vincent drew and painted his first sunflowers in the Parisian neighborhood of Montmartre. Vincent was 33 years old when he moved to Paris in 1886, but he missed the outdoor life that he knew from home. On walks through Paris, Vincent preferred to seek out places with lots of greenery. He found one such green and peaceful setting in Montmartre. He liked to go there to paint. Practising with colour The sunflowers in Montmartre were not the first flowers Vincent painted. After he had seen the fresh, colourful paintings of the Impressionists in Paris, Vincent wanted to put more colour in his work too. Flowers were excellent practice material. So for a while he painted ‘nothing but flowers’. Floral still lifes were also selling well at the time. He hoped to sell his flower paintings, but had no luck. A leading role for the sunflower Few artists were interested in sunflowers, which were considered 'coarse', inelegant plants. But, in Vincent’s opinion, that was what made them interesting. Moreover, he chose flowers that were withered and dead. And they weren’t neatly arranged in a vase either, but lying separately on the table. Vincent wasn't the first to paint sunflowers, but he was one of the first who gave the flower the leading role in a number of floral still lifes. Vincent experimented with different brushstrokes and increasingly extreme colour contrasts. For example, he placed the yellow flowers against a bright-blue background. The still lifes impressed his fellow artist Paul Gauguin. Vincent saw this as a great honour. He had just got to know Gauguin, and he looked up to him. The fact that this artist appreciated his work confirmed his feeling that he was on the right track. Sunflowers in the south After two years in Paris, Vincent moved to Arles, in the south of France. He hoped that the light and the colours of the south would provide him with inspiration. Vincent invited Gauguin to join him. Vincent was really looking forward to his friend’s arrival. He decided to paint a number of still lifes to welcome him. It was obvious what he was going to paint: sunflowers. Vincent did not place the flowers on a table this time, but in a vase. At first he painted them against blue backgrounds: from a pale greenish-blue to royal blue. He wanted the contrast between yellow and blue to be reminiscent of stained-glass windows. However, after three still lifes, he decided to continue with yellow: yellow flowers on a yellow background. He called this ‘light on light’. More yellow sunflowers Gauguin was enthusiastic about these still lifes of sunflowers, just as Vincent had hoped. And, like Vincent, he thought that the last version, a yellow one, was the most successful. This motivated Vincent to paint the yellow painting another two times. He called these new versions ‘repetitions’ . The painter of the sunflowers Vincent knew that he had made something special. He was proud of his achievement – and rightly so. Compared to the traditional dark still lifes, his sunflowers were an explosion of colour. He saw the beauty of withered flowers, just as he saw the beauty of weathered faces. Other people were impressed too. His brother Theo loved his Sunflowers. Gauguin called the sunflower paintings ‘completely Vincent’ Meaning of the sunflowers The sunflower paintings had a meaning for Vincent. He wrote that they were an expression of his gratitude. His intention was to make art that offers solace to troubled hearts. Living on The sunflower has become inextricably associated with Vincent, just as he had hoped. His friends took sunflowers to his funeral. Before long, the paintings were famous all over the world. Right from the beginning, they inspired many other artists. And to this day they are among Vincent’s most popular works. Even now, so many years after his death, many people see him first and foremost as the painter of Sunflowers. www.vangoghmuseum.nl/en
810
locals recommend
Van Gogh Museum
6 Museumplein
810
locals recommend
Take the train to Amsterdam (from Breukelen train station) and visit the Van Gogh Museum Meet Vincent The painter of Sunflowers According to Vincent van Gogh, his paintings of sunflowers were among the best works he ever made. But how did he become the painter of Sunflowers? READ FULL STORY Nowadays Vincent van Gogh is known as the man who painted Sunflowers. He painted sunflowers as no one before him had ever done. Vincent didn't always paint in the bright he's now so famous for. So, how did he come to create his masterpiece? From a single sunflower to a vase full of them Vincent began painting a single sunflower in a vegetable garden, and ended up with a work that became world-famous. There were just two years in between the two works, during which he underwent rapid artistic development The first sunflowers Vincent drew and painted his first sunflowers in the Parisian neighborhood of Montmartre. Vincent was 33 years old when he moved to Paris in 1886, but he missed the outdoor life that he knew from home. On walks through Paris, Vincent preferred to seek out places with lots of greenery. He found one such green and peaceful setting in Montmartre. He liked to go there to paint. Practising with colour The sunflowers in Montmartre were not the first flowers Vincent painted. After he had seen the fresh, colourful paintings of the Impressionists in Paris, Vincent wanted to put more colour in his work too. Flowers were excellent practice material. So for a while he painted ‘nothing but flowers’. Floral still lifes were also selling well at the time. He hoped to sell his flower paintings, but had no luck. A leading role for the sunflower Few artists were interested in sunflowers, which were considered 'coarse', inelegant plants. But, in Vincent’s opinion, that was what made them interesting. Moreover, he chose flowers that were withered and dead. And they weren’t neatly arranged in a vase either, but lying separately on the table. Vincent wasn't the first to paint sunflowers, but he was one of the first who gave the flower the leading role in a number of floral still lifes. Vincent experimented with different brushstrokes and increasingly extreme colour contrasts. For example, he placed the yellow flowers against a bright-blue background. The still lifes impressed his fellow artist Paul Gauguin. Vincent saw this as a great honour. He had just got to know Gauguin, and he looked up to him. The fact that this artist appreciated his work confirmed his feeling that he was on the right track. Sunflowers in the south After two years in Paris, Vincent moved to Arles, in the south of France. He hoped that the light and the colours of the south would provide him with inspiration. Vincent invited Gauguin to join him. Vincent was really looking forward to his friend’s arrival. He decided to paint a number of still lifes to welcome him. It was obvious what he was going to paint: sunflowers. Vincent did not place the flowers on a table this time, but in a vase. At first he painted them against blue backgrounds: from a pale greenish-blue to royal blue. He wanted the contrast between yellow and blue to be reminiscent of stained-glass windows. However, after three still lifes, he decided to continue with yellow: yellow flowers on a yellow background. He called this ‘light on light’. More yellow sunflowers Gauguin was enthusiastic about these still lifes of sunflowers, just as Vincent had hoped. And, like Vincent, he thought that the last version, a yellow one, was the most successful. This motivated Vincent to paint the yellow painting another two times. He called these new versions ‘repetitions’ . The painter of the sunflowers Vincent knew that he had made something special. He was proud of his achievement – and rightly so. Compared to the traditional dark still lifes, his sunflowers were an explosion of colour. He saw the beauty of withered flowers, just as he saw the beauty of weathered faces. Other people were impressed too. His brother Theo loved his Sunflowers. Gauguin called the sunflower paintings ‘completely Vincent’ Meaning of the sunflowers The sunflower paintings had a meaning for Vincent. He wrote that they were an expression of his gratitude. His intention was to make art that offers solace to troubled hearts. Living on The sunflower has become inextricably associated with Vincent, just as he had hoped. His friends took sunflowers to his funeral. Before long, the paintings were famous all over the world. Right from the beginning, they inspired many other artists. And to this day they are among Vincent’s most popular works. Even now, so many years after his death, many people see him first and foremost as the painter of Sunflowers. www.vangoghmuseum.nl/en
157
locals recommend
Dom Tower
21 Domplein
157
locals recommend
Food scene
Remarkable location for great biological dishes with local ingredients or just a drink in the weekends. Also the homemade pies are delicious. Located in the middle of the Dutch "polder" at 10 minutes walking from the caravan. Just 5 km from Breukelen trainstation and 20 km from Amsterdam. It has a 20 meters high view tower.
Paviljoen Toren De Grote Sniep
1, 3648AS Martin Luther King Jr Way
Remarkable location for great biological dishes with local ingredients or just a drink in the weekends. Also the homemade pies are delicious. Located in the middle of the Dutch "polder" at 10 minutes walking from the caravan. Just 5 km from Breukelen trainstation and 20 km from Amsterdam. It has a 20 meters high view tower.
Want to have some Dutch pancakes? Tailor your pancakes as you want to have them. Cheese, ham, bacon, chocolate, etc. or a combination of it all?
De Strooppot
42-43 Oostzijde
Want to have some Dutch pancakes? Tailor your pancakes as you want to have them. Cheese, ham, bacon, chocolate, etc. or a combination of it all?
Hot?! This ice cream shop is warmly recommended. Best ice cream in the area
IJssalon De IJsbeer
1 Herenweg
Hot?! This ice cream shop is warmly recommended. Best ice cream in the area
Things to do
Having a rainy day? No worries and be entertained in the nearby sub tropical simming pool 't Kikkerfort (Frog Fortress). For under 5 euro you can enjoy a couple of hours in the tropical warm waters.
Pool 't Kikkerfort
14a Schepersweg
Having a rainy day? No worries and be entertained in the nearby sub tropical simming pool 't Kikkerfort (Frog Fortress). For under 5 euro you can enjoy a couple of hours in the tropical warm waters.
Supermarkets
Super market in small village next door: Kockengen
Coop Supermarket
3 Drie Stammenweg
Super market in small village next door: Kockengen
ALDI
10 Hazeslinger
Jumbo
2 Molmlaan
Jumbo
10-25 Karel Doormanweg
Public Transportation
P+R https://www.amsterdam.nl/en/parking/park-and-ride/
74
locals recommend
Johan Cruijff ArenA
1 ArenA Boulevard
74
locals recommend
P+R https://www.amsterdam.nl/en/parking/park-and-ride/
Free parking and for approx €5 to Amsterdam central station or for approx €3 to Utrecht central station
Breukelen, Station
Free parking and for approx €5 to Amsterdam central station or for approx €3 to Utrecht central station