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A Guidebook for The Studio @ Arden House

Dawn

A Guidebook for The Studio @ Arden House

The Village
Callander Callander is a bustling tourist town situated, west of Stirling, on the River Teith and A84. The village gives visitors travelling north their first taste of the Highlands. It is set dramatically beneath high wooded crags and gained fame as the location for the original Doctor Findlay’s Casebook television series in the 1960’s. Arden House was the television home of Drs. Finlay and Cameron and their housekeeper, Janet! Being a busy town, there are plenty of shops to delve into and tasty options for morning coffee, lunch, afternoon tea or an evening meal. Cycle hire is available if you fancy exploring the area by pedal power with good quality cycle paths nearby. Callander’s Pass, formed during the last ice age, is a prominent and distinctive landscape feature that has dominated Callander’s history. The Pass is a gateway between lowland and highland Scotland and through the ages has provided a physical backdrop to arguably some of Scotland’s most colourful stories in history. Callander and its surrounding areas are steeped in history, interesting geological features, clan burial grounds, Iron Age hill forts, glacial erratics, Neolithic burial cairns and more. All can be discovered on foot or bike. The Roman Army was based in Callander, strategically positioned beneath Callander’s Pass – a glen blocker to defend the Roman Empire. The fort is unique in the Park as still having upstanding visible remains, which makes it important for both locals and visitors, including international interest. Callander still retains its original street plan dated to 1739 and much of its historical character, being designated as a Conservation Area. The town is characterised by tightly packed, gable to gable rows of buildings set hard onto the heel of the pavement on each side of the street, generally one to two storeys high – this is echoed in streets behind. In Victorian times, Callander boomed as a tourist destination off the back of the Romantic Movement, with poets and writers promoting the landscape surrounding Callander. Today, Callander has a pro-active community with a wide range of groups, societies and businesses who are working together to offer more to those who visit and live in the town.
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Callander
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Callander Callander is a bustling tourist town situated, west of Stirling, on the River Teith and A84. The village gives visitors travelling north their first taste of the Highlands. It is set dramatically beneath high wooded crags and gained fame as the location for the original Doctor Findlay’s Casebook television series in the 1960’s. Arden House was the television home of Drs. Finlay and Cameron and their housekeeper, Janet! Being a busy town, there are plenty of shops to delve into and tasty options for morning coffee, lunch, afternoon tea or an evening meal. Cycle hire is available if you fancy exploring the area by pedal power with good quality cycle paths nearby. Callander’s Pass, formed during the last ice age, is a prominent and distinctive landscape feature that has dominated Callander’s history. The Pass is a gateway between lowland and highland Scotland and through the ages has provided a physical backdrop to arguably some of Scotland’s most colourful stories in history. Callander and its surrounding areas are steeped in history, interesting geological features, clan burial grounds, Iron Age hill forts, glacial erratics, Neolithic burial cairns and more. All can be discovered on foot or bike. The Roman Army was based in Callander, strategically positioned beneath Callander’s Pass – a glen blocker to defend the Roman Empire. The fort is unique in the Park as still having upstanding visible remains, which makes it important for both locals and visitors, including international interest. Callander still retains its original street plan dated to 1739 and much of its historical character, being designated as a Conservation Area. The town is characterised by tightly packed, gable to gable rows of buildings set hard onto the heel of the pavement on each side of the street, generally one to two storeys high – this is echoed in streets behind. In Victorian times, Callander boomed as a tourist destination off the back of the Romantic Movement, with poets and writers promoting the landscape surrounding Callander. Today, Callander has a pro-active community with a wide range of groups, societies and businesses who are working together to offer more to those who visit and live in the town.
Sightseeing
INCHMAHOME PRIORY is located on a small island in the Lake of Menteith. It is a beautifully situated and largely ruined monastery (founded in 1238) with links to many famous historical names including Robert the Bruce, Mary Queen of Scots and Sir Walter Scott. The island is also home to a wide variety of plant and wildlife as well as the perfect spot for a short circular walk or a waterside picnic. Access is via a 7-minute small ferry crossing from the pier at Port of Menteith. Also at the Port of Menteith is the Lake Hotel which serves good food in their bar area or conservatory restaurant both of which have stunning views over the Lake. Perhaps you will be lucky and spot the osprey feeding. https://www.historicenvironment.scot/visit-aplace/places/inchmahome-priory/
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Inchmahome Priory
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INCHMAHOME PRIORY is located on a small island in the Lake of Menteith. It is a beautifully situated and largely ruined monastery (founded in 1238) with links to many famous historical names including Robert the Bruce, Mary Queen of Scots and Sir Walter Scott. The island is also home to a wide variety of plant and wildlife as well as the perfect spot for a short circular walk or a waterside picnic. Access is via a 7-minute small ferry crossing from the pier at Port of Menteith. Also at the Port of Menteith is the Lake Hotel which serves good food in their bar area or conservatory restaurant both of which have stunning views over the Lake. Perhaps you will be lucky and spot the osprey feeding. https://www.historicenvironment.scot/visit-aplace/places/inchmahome-priory/
DOUNE CASTLE situated on the banks of the river Teith in the village of Doune is a ruined medieval courtyard castle which still manages to inspire awe in its many visitors. The castle is a popular filming location and has featured in Monty Python & The Holy Grail (1975), Game of Thrones (2011) and more recently as Castle Leoch in Outlander. Enjoy a walking audio tour narrated by actor Terry Jones and learn about Doune’s exciting history and tales from the The Holy Grail film set. Maybe combine the visit with a tour of the whisky distillery at Deanston. https://www.historicenvironment.scot/visit-a-place/places/doune-castle/
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Doune Castle
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DOUNE CASTLE situated on the banks of the river Teith in the village of Doune is a ruined medieval courtyard castle which still manages to inspire awe in its many visitors. The castle is a popular filming location and has featured in Monty Python & The Holy Grail (1975), Game of Thrones (2011) and more recently as Castle Leoch in Outlander. Enjoy a walking audio tour narrated by actor Terry Jones and learn about Doune’s exciting history and tales from the The Holy Grail film set. Maybe combine the visit with a tour of the whisky distillery at Deanston. https://www.historicenvironment.scot/visit-a-place/places/doune-castle/
DEANSTON DISTILLERY was transformed from a cotton mill into a distillery in the 1960s. Take a tour and experience the sites, smells and sounds of a working distillery which uses traditional, hand crafted, methods to make the unique Deanston single malt whisky. Well worth a tour as is a visit to their Coffee Bothy for coffee or lunch afterwards! https://www.deanstonmalt.com/
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Deanston Distillery
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DEANSTON DISTILLERY was transformed from a cotton mill into a distillery in the 1960s. Take a tour and experience the sites, smells and sounds of a working distillery which uses traditional, hand crafted, methods to make the unique Deanston single malt whisky. Well worth a tour as is a visit to their Coffee Bothy for coffee or lunch afterwards! https://www.deanstonmalt.com/
STIRLING CASTLE is one of the largest and most historic and architecturally important castles in Scotland. Situated on Castle Hill in central Stirling it is surrounded on three sides by steep cliffs. Most of the buildings within the castle date from the 15th and 16th centuries. Several Scottish Kings and Queens have been crowned at Stirling, including Mary Queen of Scots in 1542. Enjoy a visit to the Great Hall, the Royal Palace, the Chapel Royal, the Great Kitchens, Queen Anne Gardens and view the recently completed Stirling Tapestries – a £2million pound project which took 13 years to complete and allows visitors to recapture the atmosphere of the royal court. https://www.stirli ngcastle.gov.uk/
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Stirling Castle
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STIRLING CASTLE is one of the largest and most historic and architecturally important castles in Scotland. Situated on Castle Hill in central Stirling it is surrounded on three sides by steep cliffs. Most of the buildings within the castle date from the 15th and 16th centuries. Several Scottish Kings and Queens have been crowned at Stirling, including Mary Queen of Scots in 1542. Enjoy a visit to the Great Hall, the Royal Palace, the Chapel Royal, the Great Kitchens, Queen Anne Gardens and view the recently completed Stirling Tapestries – a £2million pound project which took 13 years to complete and allows visitors to recapture the atmosphere of the royal court. https://www.stirli ngcastle.gov.uk/
The National WALLACE MONUMENT stands high on a hill top overlooking Stirling. The 67 metre tower was completed in 1869 to commemorate the 13th century Scottish hero, Sir William Wallace. It is thought that the monument is built on the spot where Wallace watched the gathering of the army of King James 1st of England, just before the battle of Stirling Bridge in 1297. Today visitors can climb the 246 step spiral staircase to the viewing gallery inside the monument’s crown, which provides fantastic views over Stirling, the Forth Valley and Ochil Hills. Nearby are the villages of Bridge of Allan with it’s independent shops, cafes and restaurants and Dunblane (the birthplace of tennis player, Andy Murray) with its impressive cathedral and further choice of eateries. https://www.nationalwallacemonument.com/ http://www.bridgeofallan.com/ www.dunblane.info/
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The National Wallace Monument
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The National WALLACE MONUMENT stands high on a hill top overlooking Stirling. The 67 metre tower was completed in 1869 to commemorate the 13th century Scottish hero, Sir William Wallace. It is thought that the monument is built on the spot where Wallace watched the gathering of the army of King James 1st of England, just before the battle of Stirling Bridge in 1297. Today visitors can climb the 246 step spiral staircase to the viewing gallery inside the monument’s crown, which provides fantastic views over Stirling, the Forth Valley and Ochil Hills. Nearby are the villages of Bridge of Allan with it’s independent shops, cafes and restaurants and Dunblane (the birthplace of tennis player, Andy Murray) with its impressive cathedral and further choice of eateries. https://www.nationalwallacemonument.com/ http://www.bridgeofallan.com/ www.dunblane.info/
The world’s only rotating boat lift, which was opened in 2002, links the Forth & Clyde and Union canals. Take a 50-minute boat trip where you will be lifted 35 metres to enjoy a sail on the Union Canal before returning to your starting point at the Visitor Centre. You could combine a trip to the Falkirk Wheel with a visit to the Kelpies and/or Linlithgow Palace both of which are located close by. https://www.scottishcanals.co.uk/falkirk-wheel/
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The Falkirk Wheel
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The world’s only rotating boat lift, which was opened in 2002, links the Forth & Clyde and Union canals. Take a 50-minute boat trip where you will be lifted 35 metres to enjoy a sail on the Union Canal before returning to your starting point at the Visitor Centre. You could combine a trip to the Falkirk Wheel with a visit to the Kelpies and/or Linlithgow Palace both of which are located close by. https://www.scottishcanals.co.uk/falkirk-wheel/
The HELIX VISITOR CENTRE and the KELPIES – the Kelpies are the world’s largest equine sculptures. Enjoy a 30-minute guided walking tour to take you through the vision of the artist Andy Scott and how history and industry impacted on the design of the sculptures. http://www.thehelix.co.uk/
The Helix Visitor Centre
The HELIX VISITOR CENTRE and the KELPIES – the Kelpies are the world’s largest equine sculptures. Enjoy a 30-minute guided walking tour to take you through the vision of the artist Andy Scott and how history and industry impacted on the design of the sculptures. http://www.thehelix.co.uk/
The SCOTTISH CRANNOG CENTRE is a unique reconstruction of an ancient loch dwelling on beautiful Loch Tay. Discover what life was like 2,500 years ago based on the remarkable discoveries by divers from the Scottish Trust for Underwater Archaeology during their underwater excavations of Oakbank Crannog at nearby Fearnan. http://www.crannog.co.uk/
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The Scottish Crannog Centre
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The SCOTTISH CRANNOG CENTRE is a unique reconstruction of an ancient loch dwelling on beautiful Loch Tay. Discover what life was like 2,500 years ago based on the remarkable discoveries by divers from the Scottish Trust for Underwater Archaeology during their underwater excavations of Oakbank Crannog at nearby Fearnan. http://www.crannog.co.uk/
DRUMMOND CASTLE GARDENS near Crieff date back to the 17th century and are one of the most important and impressive formal gardens in Europe. Drummond Castle is not open to the public. http://www.drummondcastlegardens.co.uk/
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Drummond Castle
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DRUMMOND CASTLE GARDENS near Crieff date back to the 17th century and are one of the most important and impressive formal gardens in Europe. Drummond Castle is not open to the public. http://www.drummondcastlegardens.co.uk/
TROSSACHS DRIVING TRAIL (24 miles) One of Britain’s best drives with views around every corner and lots to do. There are quaint & quirky tea rooms or visit the local bakeries, deli, sandwich shops in Callander and pack a picnic as there are some lovely secluded picnic spots along the way. A walker’s paradise with enough to keep you busy for a whole week. Do take one of the Trossachs Trail guides on display. The best way to go round is to turn left in Callander Main Street and take the A81 road towards Glasgow. Follow the signs to Aberfoyle and follow the road northwards through the Duke’s Pass. The best views are then in front of you rather than behind! Do take a detour before Aberfoyle to the Lake of Menteith (Scotland’s only Lake) and take a boat to Inchmahone Priory on an island in the Lake. Mary Queen of Scots spent part of her childhood here. It is a lovely, peaceful spot but don’t miss the last boat back! In Aberfoyle is the Scottish Wool Centre, an interesting place to browse, and just outside the village is the Queen Elizabeth Forest Park Visitors Centre with many lovely walks nearby. There is also the Loch Achray forest drive, a 10 mile drive down forest tracks, with plenty of places to picnic. On the drive you will see signposts to Loch Katrine. If time allows, take a trip on the steamship, ‘Sir Walter Scott’. Bike hire is available at Loch Katrine and it’s possible to take bikes onboard for a one-way sail which allows you to cycle the 10-mile loch side road back (only Water Board vehicles allowed). THE GREAT TROSSACHS PATH This is one of Scotland’s great walking trails, is a 30-mile long route running between Callander in the east to Inversnaid and Loch Lomond in the west, and also passing through Brig o’ Turk, the Loch Katrine area and Stronachlachar. The path connects the Rob Roy Way with the West Highland Way and also links to the Three Lochs Way, so long-distance walkers are now able to undertake an extraordinary journey through the centre of Scotland. Spurring from The Great Trossachs Path are 165km of short, long and circular routes of various lengths and challenges. And each has its own unique character. Please see the Great Trossachs Path Leaflet for the list of walks. Here are a few of our suggestions: Brenachoile Trail from the Pier at Loch Katrine: This 4 ½ miles/7.1 km tarmac trail to Brenachoile Point and back is ideal for gentle walking or cycling, and the views across the loch are breathtaking. Follow the beautiful oak-laced shore of Loch Katrine to the wonderful viewpoint on Brenachoile Point. Wide, smooth tarmac surface with moderate slopes. Brief uneven grassy path to the viewpoint with short fairly steep slope. Learn how the landscape and its history inspired artists, writers and musicians. Discover the story of the Lady of the Lake and why this place sparked the travel bug in Victorian times. Allow 2½ hours. Glen Finglas: Glen Finglas has an extensive and varied network of walking routes to suit all abilities. You can find more details in the Glen Finglas leaflet and via the interactive screen at the Visitor Gateway in the Lendrick Hill car park (opening hours: April to October, 10am – 4pm). Information is also available at Visit Scotland’s Aberfoyle iCentre (tel: 01877 381221) and the Callandar iCentre (tel: 01877 330342). You can also download an app from the Great Trossachs Forest website. Our favourite walk in Glen Finglas is as follows: Little Druim Wood and Brig o’ Turk Loop (moderate; 5.5km/3.5 miles; 2 hours) This figure-of-eight walk explores the beautiful native woodland and open countryside around Brig o' Turk (Bridge of the Wild Boar). It combines several shorter way-marked loops and gives some excellent views. Please borrow our walking notes for details of this walk.
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Trossachs
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TROSSACHS DRIVING TRAIL (24 miles) One of Britain’s best drives with views around every corner and lots to do. There are quaint & quirky tea rooms or visit the local bakeries, deli, sandwich shops in Callander and pack a picnic as there are some lovely secluded picnic spots along the way. A walker’s paradise with enough to keep you busy for a whole week. Do take one of the Trossachs Trail guides on display. The best way to go round is to turn left in Callander Main Street and take the A81 road towards Glasgow. Follow the signs to Aberfoyle and follow the road northwards through the Duke’s Pass. The best views are then in front of you rather than behind! Do take a detour before Aberfoyle to the Lake of Menteith (Scotland’s only Lake) and take a boat to Inchmahone Priory on an island in the Lake. Mary Queen of Scots spent part of her childhood here. It is a lovely, peaceful spot but don’t miss the last boat back! In Aberfoyle is the Scottish Wool Centre, an interesting place to browse, and just outside the village is the Queen Elizabeth Forest Park Visitors Centre with many lovely walks nearby. There is also the Loch Achray forest drive, a 10 mile drive down forest tracks, with plenty of places to picnic. On the drive you will see signposts to Loch Katrine. If time allows, take a trip on the steamship, ‘Sir Walter Scott’. Bike hire is available at Loch Katrine and it’s possible to take bikes onboard for a one-way sail which allows you to cycle the 10-mile loch side road back (only Water Board vehicles allowed). THE GREAT TROSSACHS PATH This is one of Scotland’s great walking trails, is a 30-mile long route running between Callander in the east to Inversnaid and Loch Lomond in the west, and also passing through Brig o’ Turk, the Loch Katrine area and Stronachlachar. The path connects the Rob Roy Way with the West Highland Way and also links to the Three Lochs Way, so long-distance walkers are now able to undertake an extraordinary journey through the centre of Scotland. Spurring from The Great Trossachs Path are 165km of short, long and circular routes of various lengths and challenges. And each has its own unique character. Please see the Great Trossachs Path Leaflet for the list of walks. Here are a few of our suggestions: Brenachoile Trail from the Pier at Loch Katrine: This 4 ½ miles/7.1 km tarmac trail to Brenachoile Point and back is ideal for gentle walking or cycling, and the views across the loch are breathtaking. Follow the beautiful oak-laced shore of Loch Katrine to the wonderful viewpoint on Brenachoile Point. Wide, smooth tarmac surface with moderate slopes. Brief uneven grassy path to the viewpoint with short fairly steep slope. Learn how the landscape and its history inspired artists, writers and musicians. Discover the story of the Lady of the Lake and why this place sparked the travel bug in Victorian times. Allow 2½ hours. Glen Finglas: Glen Finglas has an extensive and varied network of walking routes to suit all abilities. You can find more details in the Glen Finglas leaflet and via the interactive screen at the Visitor Gateway in the Lendrick Hill car park (opening hours: April to October, 10am – 4pm). Information is also available at Visit Scotland’s Aberfoyle iCentre (tel: 01877 381221) and the Callandar iCentre (tel: 01877 330342). You can also download an app from the Great Trossachs Forest website. Our favourite walk in Glen Finglas is as follows: Little Druim Wood and Brig o’ Turk Loop (moderate; 5.5km/3.5 miles; 2 hours) This figure-of-eight walk explores the beautiful native woodland and open countryside around Brig o' Turk (Bridge of the Wild Boar). It combines several shorter way-marked loops and gives some excellent views. Please borrow our walking notes for details of this walk.
LOCH LOMOND (40 miles and 90 miles) Loch Lomond can be approached from Callander via a number of different routes. The most interesting and picturesque way to approach Loch Lomond is via Aberfoyle on the B829. The road passes Lochs Ard, Chon and Arklet and you can take a detour to the top of Loch Katrine. Unfortunately though, you have to take the same route back. There is an impressive view of Loch Lomond from the Inversnaid Hotel where you can also take tea and a passenger ferry across the loch – do take one of the Loch Lomond water bus & ferry timetables http://www.cruiselochlomond.co.uk/tarbet-inversnaid-ferry. Another route to the loch is to follow the A81 road towards Glasgow, turn off on the A811 to Drymen, and the B837 to Balmaha. Alternatively for a full day out, follow the A84 road from Callander North to Crainlarich and then take the A82 road which follows the whole of the western side of Loch Lomond. Take time to visit the pretty loch side village of Luss where the ‘Highroad’ TV soap was filmed http://www.lochlomond-trossachs.org/. A trip to Loch Lomond Shores for leisure and shopping at Balloch is also worth the effort http://www.lochlomondshores.com/.
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Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park
20 Carrochan Rd
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LOCH LOMOND (40 miles and 90 miles) Loch Lomond can be approached from Callander via a number of different routes. The most interesting and picturesque way to approach Loch Lomond is via Aberfoyle on the B829. The road passes Lochs Ard, Chon and Arklet and you can take a detour to the top of Loch Katrine. Unfortunately though, you have to take the same route back. There is an impressive view of Loch Lomond from the Inversnaid Hotel where you can also take tea and a passenger ferry across the loch – do take one of the Loch Lomond water bus & ferry timetables http://www.cruiselochlomond.co.uk/tarbet-inversnaid-ferry. Another route to the loch is to follow the A81 road towards Glasgow, turn off on the A811 to Drymen, and the B837 to Balmaha. Alternatively for a full day out, follow the A84 road from Callander North to Crainlarich and then take the A82 road which follows the whole of the western side of Loch Lomond. Take time to visit the pretty loch side village of Luss where the ‘Highroad’ TV soap was filmed http://www.lochlomond-trossachs.org/. A trip to Loch Lomond Shores for leisure and shopping at Balloch is also worth the effort http://www.lochlomondshores.com/.
LOCH TAY DRIVING ROUTE (94 miles) This is a must for anyone staying more than a few days as it takes in a sample of all the best parts of the local scenery. Take the A84 road north through Strathyre and Lochearnhead. Turn onto the A827 to Killin, a pretty little village with the dramatic Falls of Dochart on entering the village. Take the single track road marked South Loch Tay (right) just before the bridge. This road dips and rises along the 20 miles of the loch with marvellous views. At the end of the loch is Kenmore, a charming village with a very good hotel for lunch. Also look out for the Crannog Centre at the side of the loch, a rebuilt Iron Age loch side dwelling. From Kenmore follow the main road to Aberfeldy, with plenty of tea shops for a snack. Then follow the A826 to Crieff through the dramatic Sma’ Glen. Near Crieff is Glenturret distillery (Scotland’s oldest) https://experience.thefamousgrouse.com/visit/ and Drummond Castle gardens, possibly Scotland’s finest formal gardens. From Crieff take the A85 to Comrie, pass along Loch Earn and join the A84 road back to Callander.
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Loch Tay
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LOCH TAY DRIVING ROUTE (94 miles) This is a must for anyone staying more than a few days as it takes in a sample of all the best parts of the local scenery. Take the A84 road north through Strathyre and Lochearnhead. Turn onto the A827 to Killin, a pretty little village with the dramatic Falls of Dochart on entering the village. Take the single track road marked South Loch Tay (right) just before the bridge. This road dips and rises along the 20 miles of the loch with marvellous views. At the end of the loch is Kenmore, a charming village with a very good hotel for lunch. Also look out for the Crannog Centre at the side of the loch, a rebuilt Iron Age loch side dwelling. From Kenmore follow the main road to Aberfeldy, with plenty of tea shops for a snack. Then follow the A826 to Crieff through the dramatic Sma’ Glen. Near Crieff is Glenturret distillery (Scotland’s oldest) https://experience.thefamousgrouse.com/visit/ and Drummond Castle gardens, possibly Scotland’s finest formal gardens. From Crieff take the A85 to Comrie, pass along Loch Earn and join the A84 road back to Callander.
GLENCOE AND FORT WILLIAM DRIVING ROUTE (130 miles, 163 miles and 190 miles) This might seem like a bit of a hike, but the grandeur of Glencoe is only an hour’s drive away and Fort William a further half hour beyond. To complete the loop you might like to proceed along the coast from Ballachulish to Connel and pick up the A85 road back to Callander.
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Glencoe
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GLENCOE AND FORT WILLIAM DRIVING ROUTE (130 miles, 163 miles and 190 miles) This might seem like a bit of a hike, but the grandeur of Glencoe is only an hour’s drive away and Fort William a further half hour beyond. To complete the loop you might like to proceed along the coast from Ballachulish to Connel and pick up the A85 road back to Callander.
EDINBURGH Edinburgh is one of the world’s most attractive capitals, and an hour from Callander. If you don’t want the hassle of traffic and parking your car in the city centre, take the train https://www.scotrail.co.uk/ from Stirling or Bridge of Allan (free parking) right into the city centre. Once in the centre there is no need for a car. The best way to get your bearings is to take an open top bus tour which is good value because you can jump on and off all day on the same ticket. Apart from the Old Town around the Castle, take time to explore some of the beautiful squares and gardens of the New (Georgian!) Town, and shop on Princes Street and George Street. The National Gallery of Scotland is well worth a visit as is the National Museum of Scotland. The former Royal Yacht Britannia is moored at nearby Leith. Edinburgh has many places to eat and is particularly lively around festival time in August.
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Edinburgh
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EDINBURGH Edinburgh is one of the world’s most attractive capitals, and an hour from Callander. If you don’t want the hassle of traffic and parking your car in the city centre, take the train https://www.scotrail.co.uk/ from Stirling or Bridge of Allan (free parking) right into the city centre. Once in the centre there is no need for a car. The best way to get your bearings is to take an open top bus tour which is good value because you can jump on and off all day on the same ticket. Apart from the Old Town around the Castle, take time to explore some of the beautiful squares and gardens of the New (Georgian!) Town, and shop on Princes Street and George Street. The National Gallery of Scotland is well worth a visit as is the National Museum of Scotland. The former Royal Yacht Britannia is moored at nearby Leith. Edinburgh has many places to eat and is particularly lively around festival time in August.
GLASGOW Glasgow is Scotland’s largest city. More spread out than Edinburgh, it nevertheless has many attractions and fine Victorian buildings. The world famous Burrell Collection of 8000 items, including French paintings, medieval tapestries and English stained glass is housed in a purpose built building in Pollok Park (currently closed until 2020 for refurbishment). The Kelvingrove Gallery is housed in a wonderful Victorian Gothic building near the University. Admirers of Charles Rennie Mackintosh should visit the Hunterian Museum, which contains a full size Mackintosh designed house, and the Willow Tea Rooms in the centre of town. The Hunterian also contains many fine works by Scottish artists including the ‘Glasgow Boys’. Glasgow is less than an hour away. The quickest route by car is via Stirling and the M80 motorway. A more scenic route is to take the A81 road from the centre of Callander. Alternatively, take the train https://www.scotrail.co.uk/ from Bridge of Allan (free parking) or Stirling.
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Glasgow
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GLASGOW Glasgow is Scotland’s largest city. More spread out than Edinburgh, it nevertheless has many attractions and fine Victorian buildings. The world famous Burrell Collection of 8000 items, including French paintings, medieval tapestries and English stained glass is housed in a purpose built building in Pollok Park (currently closed until 2020 for refurbishment). The Kelvingrove Gallery is housed in a wonderful Victorian Gothic building near the University. Admirers of Charles Rennie Mackintosh should visit the Hunterian Museum, which contains a full size Mackintosh designed house, and the Willow Tea Rooms in the centre of town. The Hunterian also contains many fine works by Scottish artists including the ‘Glasgow Boys’. Glasgow is less than an hour away. The quickest route by car is via Stirling and the M80 motorway. A more scenic route is to take the A81 road from the centre of Callander. Alternatively, take the train https://www.scotrail.co.uk/ from Bridge of Allan (free parking) or Stirling.
Bracklinn Falls Circuit A great mid-level 3 ½ miles (5.3 km) walk, from the door step of Arden House, through varied woodland to the Bracklinn bridge with views over the Bracklinn Falls and gorge below. The path crosses back over the Keltie Water at a wide pool known as Scout Pool and returns to the car park by a minor road. Path is well-compacted with some loose materials. Allow 2 – 2 ½ hours. Please borrow a detailed walking card for route details.
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Bracklinn Falls Bridge
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Bracklinn Falls Circuit A great mid-level 3 ½ miles (5.3 km) walk, from the door step of Arden House, through varied woodland to the Bracklinn bridge with views over the Bracklinn Falls and gorge below. The path crosses back over the Keltie Water at a wide pool known as Scout Pool and returns to the car park by a minor road. Path is well-compacted with some loose materials. Allow 2 – 2 ½ hours. Please borrow a detailed walking card for route details.
Whether you want to do a little or do a lot, The Lodge Visitor Centre in the heart of the Queen Elizabeth Forest Park is made for you. Relax and enjoy the spectacular views, stroll to the waterfall, visit the Red Squirrel Hide or swing through the trees with Go-Ape! There are several well-signed paths – our favourite is … The Waterfall Trail Trail A pleasant 1 mile/1.8 km stroll through the trees to a dramatic waterfall that appears as if by magic. Plenty of places to sit along the way. Wide, firm gravel surface throughout, with some loose stones. Long gentle slope for 400m with some short moderate sections. Short section of uneven wooden boardwalk. Allow ½ hour. Look out for reflective artworks and feel the breeze beside the tumbling waterfall. Wind back up to The Lodge from here or continue through towering Norway spruce and over an arched wooden bridge to reach the Red Squirrel Hide.
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Queen Elizabeth Forest Park
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Whether you want to do a little or do a lot, The Lodge Visitor Centre in the heart of the Queen Elizabeth Forest Park is made for you. Relax and enjoy the spectacular views, stroll to the waterfall, visit the Red Squirrel Hide or swing through the trees with Go-Ape! There are several well-signed paths – our favourite is … The Waterfall Trail Trail A pleasant 1 mile/1.8 km stroll through the trees to a dramatic waterfall that appears as if by magic. Plenty of places to sit along the way. Wide, firm gravel surface throughout, with some loose stones. Long gentle slope for 400m with some short moderate sections. Short section of uneven wooden boardwalk. Allow ½ hour. Look out for reflective artworks and feel the breeze beside the tumbling waterfall. Wind back up to The Lodge from here or continue through towering Norway spruce and over an arched wooden bridge to reach the Red Squirrel Hide.
Ben Lomond (974m) Situated on the eastern shores of Loch Lomond at the gateway to the Highlands. Ben Lomond provides a dramatic backdrop to the loch and is a landmark summit. Its surrounding areas are largely undeveloped and have an open and wild sense of place. Ben Lomond and Ben Vorlich across the loch are both designated as SSSI (Sites of Special Scientific Interest) with species that include black grouse, ptarmigan, upland waders, eagle, pine marten, red deer, mountain hare and water vole. The views from the summit are truly spectacular. Whether you choose to walk up and down on the well-laid “tourist” trail or a circuit via Ptarmigan Ridge, make sure you stop every so often to look out over the landscape. It’s clear to see where the Highland Fault Line crosses the park, giving way to lowlands scenery to the south and Highlands to the north. Walk Statistics: Distance 12km/7.5 miles, Time 4.5 – 5.5 hours
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Ben Lomond
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Ben Lomond (974m) Situated on the eastern shores of Loch Lomond at the gateway to the Highlands. Ben Lomond provides a dramatic backdrop to the loch and is a landmark summit. Its surrounding areas are largely undeveloped and have an open and wild sense of place. Ben Lomond and Ben Vorlich across the loch are both designated as SSSI (Sites of Special Scientific Interest) with species that include black grouse, ptarmigan, upland waders, eagle, pine marten, red deer, mountain hare and water vole. The views from the summit are truly spectacular. Whether you choose to walk up and down on the well-laid “tourist” trail or a circuit via Ptarmigan Ridge, make sure you stop every so often to look out over the landscape. It’s clear to see where the Highland Fault Line crosses the park, giving way to lowlands scenery to the south and Highlands to the north. Walk Statistics: Distance 12km/7.5 miles, Time 4.5 – 5.5 hours
Ben Ledi Ben Ledi is a familiar landmark from Callander and the highest mountain in the main part of the Trossachs. It is a very popular hill walk and its position on the edge of the Highlands makes it an excellent viewpoint. In the past, local people celebrated the summer solstice on the summit, getting as close to heaven as they could. This may explain why Ben Ledi's name has been translated from the Gaelic as the Mountain of God! Walk Statistics: Distance 10km/6.25 miles, Time 4 – 6 hours, Assent 760m There is a well maintained hill path for the ascent, but rougher with some boggy sections on the descent. As with any mountain walk, hillwalking gear must be carried.
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Ben Ledi
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Ben Ledi Ben Ledi is a familiar landmark from Callander and the highest mountain in the main part of the Trossachs. It is a very popular hill walk and its position on the edge of the Highlands makes it an excellent viewpoint. In the past, local people celebrated the summer solstice on the summit, getting as close to heaven as they could. This may explain why Ben Ledi's name has been translated from the Gaelic as the Mountain of God! Walk Statistics: Distance 10km/6.25 miles, Time 4 – 6 hours, Assent 760m There is a well maintained hill path for the ascent, but rougher with some boggy sections on the descent. As with any mountain walk, hillwalking gear must be carried.
Ben A'an is one of the most popular amongst Scotland's smaller hills. A recently-upgraded path easily leads walkers from a car park on the A821, on the banks of pretty Loch Achray. Although a little steep in places, the walk of around 4km might be short but it offers a surprisingly big experience. For a small hill you’ll enjoy many of the ingredients of a mountain hike, such as atmospheric forest, open moorlands, views of crags and a superb vista of the surrounding landscape at the top. Return on the same path.
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Ben A'an
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Ben A'an is one of the most popular amongst Scotland's smaller hills. A recently-upgraded path easily leads walkers from a car park on the A821, on the banks of pretty Loch Achray. Although a little steep in places, the walk of around 4km might be short but it offers a surprisingly big experience. For a small hill you’ll enjoy many of the ingredients of a mountain hike, such as atmospheric forest, open moorlands, views of crags and a superb vista of the surrounding landscape at the top. Return on the same path.
Located on the eastern side of Loch Lomond walkers leave the popular village of Balmaha for a short but fairly stiff climb to the top of Conic Hill, 361m high. The rewards come in the expansive views seen throughout the walk and from the top, especially of Loch Lomond and its islands. If you look to the south you can admire the mosaic of farmland and woodland, with field boundaries, trees and shelterbelts, which creates a distinctive and intimate lowland landscape that contrasts with other more rugged parts of the National Park. The path is easy to find and well-trodden. You will reach a false summit before the top proper but you will know when you are there because the vista is spectacular. Below is Loch Lomond and its many islands while further afield you’ll see the rocky Arrochar Alps and the most southerly Munro, Ben Lomond. The beauty of this hike is that you don’t need to go all the way up to take in the generous views, as they will start unfolding at your feet from a third of the way up. Reward yourself afterwards with a drink or meal at the Oak Tree Inn https://www.theoaktreeinn.co.uk/.
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Conic Hill
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Located on the eastern side of Loch Lomond walkers leave the popular village of Balmaha for a short but fairly stiff climb to the top of Conic Hill, 361m high. The rewards come in the expansive views seen throughout the walk and from the top, especially of Loch Lomond and its islands. If you look to the south you can admire the mosaic of farmland and woodland, with field boundaries, trees and shelterbelts, which creates a distinctive and intimate lowland landscape that contrasts with other more rugged parts of the National Park. The path is easy to find and well-trodden. You will reach a false summit before the top proper but you will know when you are there because the vista is spectacular. Below is Loch Lomond and its many islands while further afield you’ll see the rocky Arrochar Alps and the most southerly Munro, Ben Lomond. The beauty of this hike is that you don’t need to go all the way up to take in the generous views, as they will start unfolding at your feet from a third of the way up. Reward yourself afterwards with a drink or meal at the Oak Tree Inn https://www.theoaktreeinn.co.uk/.
We have a detailed cycle map/guide to six cycle rides around the Trossachs designed to appeal to cyclists of all abilities. Cycle hire is available in Callander and at Loch Katrine. Our favourite cycles are … Callander to Strathyre 18 miles (return journey) which follows the line of the former Callander to Oban Railway. This ride is part of National Route 7 between Inverness and Glasgow. Callander to Brig o’ Turk 16 miles (return journey) is a very gentle with no significant hills. Alongside Loch Venachar the ride follows part of Natiional Route 7. Loch Katrine 13 miles (one way). A magnificent ride along undulating Water Board road. Hire a bike at Loch Katrine and enjoy a sail on the loch with your bike to Stronachlachar for the return cycle ride. For details of sailing times and fares telephone 01877 376315 http://www.lochkatrine.com/. It is advisable to book ahead.
Wheels Cycling Centre
We have a detailed cycle map/guide to six cycle rides around the Trossachs designed to appeal to cyclists of all abilities. Cycle hire is available in Callander and at Loch Katrine. Our favourite cycles are … Callander to Strathyre 18 miles (return journey) which follows the line of the former Callander to Oban Railway. This ride is part of National Route 7 between Inverness and Glasgow. Callander to Brig o’ Turk 16 miles (return journey) is a very gentle with no significant hills. Alongside Loch Venachar the ride follows part of Natiional Route 7. Loch Katrine 13 miles (one way). A magnificent ride along undulating Water Board road. Hire a bike at Loch Katrine and enjoy a sail on the loch with your bike to Stronachlachar for the return cycle ride. For details of sailing times and fares telephone 01877 376315 http://www.lochkatrine.com/. It is advisable to book ahead.
Enjoy a round of golf amongst stunning scenery at Callander Golf Club. Buggy hire and trolley hire are available. The 18-hole course is challenging enough for all levels of golfers. Highly rated by many golf writers, Callander Golf Club appeared in a list of Scotland’s top 10 courses to visit compiled by Golf Monthly! The National Club Golfer magazine described Callander as "... a fantastically secluded location, diverse holes with great greens and stunning views of Ben Ledi and the Trossachs all combine to create a memorable experience". There are many other golf courses to enjoy not too far away. Aberfoyle, Killin, Stirling and Balfron all have reasonable green fees and the world famous Gleneagles golf complex, with three superb championship courses is just a 25 minute drive from Callander. http://www.callandergolfclub.co.uk/
Callander Golf Club
Enjoy a round of golf amongst stunning scenery at Callander Golf Club. Buggy hire and trolley hire are available. The 18-hole course is challenging enough for all levels of golfers. Highly rated by many golf writers, Callander Golf Club appeared in a list of Scotland’s top 10 courses to visit compiled by Golf Monthly! The National Club Golfer magazine described Callander as "... a fantastically secluded location, diverse holes with great greens and stunning views of Ben Ledi and the Trossachs all combine to create a memorable experience". There are many other golf courses to enjoy not too far away. Aberfoyle, Killin, Stirling and Balfron all have reasonable green fees and the world famous Gleneagles golf complex, with three superb championship courses is just a 25 minute drive from Callander. http://www.callandergolfclub.co.uk/
FISHING: With lochs and rivers throughout, the Trossachs has opportunities galore for both game fishing and course fishing. Salmon, sea trout, pike and brown trout are just some of the species on offer in this part of Scotland. Always be sure to obtain the correct permissions needed at http://www.fishinginthetrossachs.co.uk/fishing-permits/. In and around Callander: Salmon and Sea Trout – The River Teith, River Leny and Loch Lubnaig all offer salmon or sea trout angling between 1st February to 31st October. Brown Trout fishing is permitted on all lochs and rivers between 15th March – 6th October (providing correct permits are obtained) on the above waters and also at Loch Katrine and Loch Venachar where boat hire is also available.
River Teith
FISHING: With lochs and rivers throughout, the Trossachs has opportunities galore for both game fishing and course fishing. Salmon, sea trout, pike and brown trout are just some of the species on offer in this part of Scotland. Always be sure to obtain the correct permissions needed at http://www.fishinginthetrossachs.co.uk/fishing-permits/. In and around Callander: Salmon and Sea Trout – The River Teith, River Leny and Loch Lubnaig all offer salmon or sea trout angling between 1st February to 31st October. Brown Trout fishing is permitted on all lochs and rivers between 15th March – 6th October (providing correct permits are obtained) on the above waters and also at Loch Katrine and Loch Venachar where boat hire is also available.
Food scene
The Roman Camp Hotel & The Potting Shed, FK17 8GB. Tel: 01877 330003 (hotel) or 01877 332692 (Potting Shed) The entrance is opposite the bottom of Bracklinn Road. A former hunting lodge built for the Dukes of Perth, and a favourite stopping place of Queen Victoria. Today it is just the place for that special treat as the food served in the dining room has been awarded three rosettes by the AA. For something a little less formal, try the Potting Shed which is a fabulous little coffee shop and bistro set within the hotel grounds. The Potting Shed serves brunch, lunch, coffees and dinner from 11am until last orders at 8:15pm. Alternatively, try an afternoon tea, soup and sandwiches or delicious scones daily in the lounge. www.romancamphotel.co.uk.
Roman camp bistro
The Roman Camp Hotel & The Potting Shed, FK17 8GB. Tel: 01877 330003 (hotel) or 01877 332692 (Potting Shed) The entrance is opposite the bottom of Bracklinn Road. A former hunting lodge built for the Dukes of Perth, and a favourite stopping place of Queen Victoria. Today it is just the place for that special treat as the food served in the dining room has been awarded three rosettes by the AA. For something a little less formal, try the Potting Shed which is a fabulous little coffee shop and bistro set within the hotel grounds. The Potting Shed serves brunch, lunch, coffees and dinner from 11am until last orders at 8:15pm. Alternatively, try an afternoon tea, soup and sandwiches or delicious scones daily in the lounge. www.romancamphotel.co.uk.
Mhor Fish, 75 Main Street, FK17 8DX. Tel: 01877 330213 A genuine ‘Retro Cafe’ serving arguably the best fish and chips in Callander. Under the same family ownership as the award winning Monachyle Mhor Hotel, Balquhidder. A great choice of fresh fish and seafood cooked however you want it. It doesn’t have to be battered! The cafe also serves a few tasty alternatives, including fish chowder, handmade Scottish beef burgers, Isle of Lewis Mussels and homemade desserts. Also try the Mhor Bread Cafe run by the same family adjacent to the bakers of the same name (great pies). Usually closed Mondays. www.mhor.net/fish.
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Mhor Fish
75-77 Main St
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Mhor Fish, 75 Main Street, FK17 8DX. Tel: 01877 330213 A genuine ‘Retro Cafe’ serving arguably the best fish and chips in Callander. Under the same family ownership as the award winning Monachyle Mhor Hotel, Balquhidder. A great choice of fresh fish and seafood cooked however you want it. It doesn’t have to be battered! The cafe also serves a few tasty alternatives, including fish chowder, handmade Scottish beef burgers, Isle of Lewis Mussels and homemade desserts. Also try the Mhor Bread Cafe run by the same family adjacent to the bakers of the same name (great pies). Usually closed Mondays. www.mhor.net/fish.
Kilmahog is a hamlet situated half a mile to the west of Callander – a five minute drive from Arden House or a pleasant 25 minute walk along the riverside path. The Lade Inn, Kilmahog, FK17 8HD. Tel: 01877 330152 Hearty Scottish locally sourced produce served in a good traditional pub atmosphere. Dine in the Bothy Bar or separate restaurant. They brew their own ale too! www.theladeinn.com
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The Lade Inn
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Kilmahog is a hamlet situated half a mile to the west of Callander – a five minute drive from Arden House or a pleasant 25 minute walk along the riverside path. The Lade Inn, Kilmahog, FK17 8HD. Tel: 01877 330152 Hearty Scottish locally sourced produce served in a good traditional pub atmosphere. Dine in the Bothy Bar or separate restaurant. They brew their own ale too! www.theladeinn.com
The Lake Hotel, FK8 3RA. Tel: 01877 385258 Stylish country house hotel on the shores of the Lake of Menteith (10 minute drive from Arden House). Conservatory restaurant with a romantic setting overlooking the lake towards Inchmahome Priory. The Port Bar also serves food. Finest Scottish produce simply prepared. www.lake-hotel.com.
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The Lake of Menteith Hotel
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The Lake Hotel, FK8 3RA. Tel: 01877 385258 Stylish country house hotel on the shores of the Lake of Menteith (10 minute drive from Arden House). Conservatory restaurant with a romantic setting overlooking the lake towards Inchmahome Priory. The Port Bar also serves food. Finest Scottish produce simply prepared. www.lake-hotel.com.
Lion & Unicorn, Main Street. FK8 3PJ. Tel: 01786 850204 A traditional country pub hotel with a restaurant serving an extensive lunch and dinner menu in a cosy atmosphere. www.lion-unicorn.co.uk
Lion & Unicorn
Lion & Unicorn, Main Street. FK8 3PJ. Tel: 01786 850204 A traditional country pub hotel with a restaurant serving an extensive lunch and dinner menu in a cosy atmosphere. www.lion-unicorn.co.uk
The Riverside, Stirling Road, FK15 9EP. Tel: 01786 823318 A friendly pub/restaurant serving breakfast, lunch, tea, coffee, home-baking and dinner seven days a week. Enjoy the log burner when the weather is poor or the riverside terrace on warmer days. www.theriversidedunlane.co.uk
The Riverside - Pub, Kitchen & Coffee House
7C Stirling Road
The Riverside, Stirling Road, FK15 9EP. Tel: 01786 823318 A friendly pub/restaurant serving breakfast, lunch, tea, coffee, home-baking and dinner seven days a week. Enjoy the log burner when the weather is poor or the riverside terrace on warmer days. www.theriversidedunlane.co.uk
Leny Road Callander Stirling FK17 8AL Opening hours: Every day: 6am – 11pm
Tesco Express
Leny Road Callander Stirling FK17 8AL Opening hours: Every day: 6am – 11pm
124 Main Street, Callander, FK17 8BG Opening hours: Every day: 7am - 10pm
Co-op Food
124 Main St
124 Main Street, Callander, FK17 8BG Opening hours: Every day: 7am - 10pm
BUTCHER: D Campbell & Son Butchers 28 Ancaster Square Callander FK17 8BL
Campbell D & Son
28 Ancaster Square
BUTCHER: D Campbell & Son Butchers 28 Ancaster Square Callander FK17 8BL
BAKERS: Main Street Bakery 56 Main St Callander FK17 8BD Mhor Bread 8 Main St Callander FK17 8BB
Main Street Bakery
56 Main Street
BAKERS: Main Street Bakery 56 Main St Callander FK17 8BD Mhor Bread 8 Main St Callander FK17 8BB

City advice

Getting around
Public transport is limited.
Directions to Arden House (postcode FK17 8EQ) By car: Callander is located 16 miles north of Stirling From the south: exit the M9 at Junction 10, signposted Crianlarich. Take A84, passing Doune, for 14 miles to Callander. In Callander, turn right into Bracklinn Road before entering the centre of the village (signposted to the Golf Course and Bracklinn Falls). Arden House is 200 yards on the left and our car park is located at the rear of the house.