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Lika-Senj county recommendation book!

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Lika-Senj county recommendation book!

Razgledavanje
Plitvice Lakes National Park is one of the oldest and largest national parks in Croatia. In 1979, Plitvice Lakes National Park was added to the UNESCO World Heritage register. The national park was founded in 1949 and is in the mountainous karst area of central Croatia, at the border to Bosnia and Herzegovina. The important north-south road that passes through the national park area connects the Croatian inland with the Adriatic coastal region. The protected area extends over 296.85 square kilometers. About 90% of this area is part of Lika-Senj County, while the remaining 10% is part of Karlovac County. Each year, more than 1 million visitors are recorded. Entrance is subject to variable charges, up to 250 kuna or around €34 per adult per day in summer 2018. It is important to reserve your visit on the Plitvice lakes official page, otherwise, you may not be able to enter in due to limitations.
190
locals recommend
Plitvice Lakes National Park
190
locals recommend
Plitvice Lakes National Park is one of the oldest and largest national parks in Croatia. In 1979, Plitvice Lakes National Park was added to the UNESCO World Heritage register. The national park was founded in 1949 and is in the mountainous karst area of central Croatia, at the border to Bosnia and Herzegovina. The important north-south road that passes through the national park area connects the Croatian inland with the Adriatic coastal region. The protected area extends over 296.85 square kilometers. About 90% of this area is part of Lika-Senj County, while the remaining 10% is part of Karlovac County. Each year, more than 1 million visitors are recorded. Entrance is subject to variable charges, up to 250 kuna or around €34 per adult per day in summer 2018. It is important to reserve your visit on the Plitvice lakes official page, otherwise, you may not be able to enter in due to limitations.
Beautiful place and more beautiful animals ... bears are wonderful ... if you are passing throug definitely stop and visit. You can help the volunteers to make life easier for these wonderful animals. It is a way to drive, in the middle of the country side. But, worth a visit. These people, all volunteers, help these orphanaged brown bears live a decent life. There are some 800-1000 brown bears left in Croatia. None die a natural death. All human. And Croatia gives out licenses to hunt up to 120 bears a year. More that 10% of the total bear population! This organization needs our attention and our support. And it is lovely to see these gorgeous, peaceful bears.
Bear Refuge
Beautiful place and more beautiful animals ... bears are wonderful ... if you are passing throug definitely stop and visit. You can help the volunteers to make life easier for these wonderful animals. It is a way to drive, in the middle of the country side. But, worth a visit. These people, all volunteers, help these orphanaged brown bears live a decent life. There are some 800-1000 brown bears left in Croatia. None die a natural death. All human. And Croatia gives out licenses to hunt up to 120 bears a year. More that 10% of the total bear population! This organization needs our attention and our support. And it is lovely to see these gorgeous, peaceful bears.
There were about sixty functional mills on Gacka river and its tributaries worked during the course of the 20th century. Today, only few of them are still in use and tyey are located at the river Gacka springs. Representing the ballacne between man and nature they keep the memory of an old, extinct crafts. Come, experience the history: you can come individually or in groups. Contact the miller Jure Majer at + 385 (0)99 831 4381 How to arrive: Gacka can be reached from motorway A1 at Exit no.10 for Otočac. On the road towards the locality of Vrhovine in the direction of Korenica and Plitvice there is a sign for turning towards Sinac, i.e the source of the Gacka River.
Majerovo vrilo
There were about sixty functional mills on Gacka river and its tributaries worked during the course of the 20th century. Today, only few of them are still in use and tyey are located at the river Gacka springs. Representing the ballacne between man and nature they keep the memory of an old, extinct crafts. Come, experience the history: you can come individually or in groups. Contact the miller Jure Majer at + 385 (0)99 831 4381 How to arrive: Gacka can be reached from motorway A1 at Exit no.10 for Otočac. On the road towards the locality of Vrhovine in the direction of Korenica and Plitvice there is a sign for turning towards Sinac, i.e the source of the Gacka River.
The Gacka Valley is a large karst valley fringed with mountain ranges of Velebit on the coast side and with Kapela Mountain on the inland side. The valley is dominated by the river Gacka which springs at one end of the valley and sinks underground on the opposite end. Gacka is the third longest sinking river in the world. Originally 32 km long, the river’s course was cut down to 11 km with the construction of the Hydro Electric Power Plant Senj in 1960. In the Otočac area, most of the river’s waters are diverted through tunnels to an artificial lake called the Gusić Jezero. Owing to a gently sloping terrain, the river’s course is tranquil and winding. The waters of Gacka are extremely clean and rich in oxygen. The largest town in the Gacka area is Otočac, originally built at a river fork where the Gacka branches formed an “island” surrounded by water on all sides. Today Otočac has 4,000 inhabitants. The Gacka source area consists of numerous smaller springs, the three strongest among them: the Tonković Vrilo, Klanac and Majerovo Vrilo. The springs resembling little lakes are very picturesque. To be seen here are many old watermills – malenice, many of which reconstructed and restored in a traditional style. There are also saw mills, fulling mills and cloth washing troughs. The people inhabiting the Gacka area navigated the river using plav, traditional boats carved from fir tree trunks, typical for the Gacka. The river is rich in diverse water plants which are so abundant that people harvest them as cattle feed. Until 1937, only four fish species inhabited the Gacka: trout, European eel, weather loach, and pike, probably introduced during the reign of the Frankopan dukes. Gacka also provided habitat to stone crayfish which disappeared in 1931 due to crab plague. Later, numerous other fish species were introduced into the Gacka, while other made their way to the river through the canal built between Gacka and the Lika rivers to serve the Hydro Electric Power Plant. To be found in the Gacka today are also the rainbow trout, grayling, carp, tench, roach, chub, and pumpkinseed. These introduced species have disturbed the biological balance and reduced the purity of water. Trout in the Gacka grow very fast (about five times faster than in other karst rivers) and are known among anglers throughout the globe.
KANU - KAJAK KLUB GACKA OTOČAC
2 Ulica bana Josipa Jelačića
The Gacka Valley is a large karst valley fringed with mountain ranges of Velebit on the coast side and with Kapela Mountain on the inland side. The valley is dominated by the river Gacka which springs at one end of the valley and sinks underground on the opposite end. Gacka is the third longest sinking river in the world. Originally 32 km long, the river’s course was cut down to 11 km with the construction of the Hydro Electric Power Plant Senj in 1960. In the Otočac area, most of the river’s waters are diverted through tunnels to an artificial lake called the Gusić Jezero. Owing to a gently sloping terrain, the river’s course is tranquil and winding. The waters of Gacka are extremely clean and rich in oxygen. The largest town in the Gacka area is Otočac, originally built at a river fork where the Gacka branches formed an “island” surrounded by water on all sides. Today Otočac has 4,000 inhabitants. The Gacka source area consists of numerous smaller springs, the three strongest among them: the Tonković Vrilo, Klanac and Majerovo Vrilo. The springs resembling little lakes are very picturesque. To be seen here are many old watermills – malenice, many of which reconstructed and restored in a traditional style. There are also saw mills, fulling mills and cloth washing troughs. The people inhabiting the Gacka area navigated the river using plav, traditional boats carved from fir tree trunks, typical for the Gacka. The river is rich in diverse water plants which are so abundant that people harvest them as cattle feed. Until 1937, only four fish species inhabited the Gacka: trout, European eel, weather loach, and pike, probably introduced during the reign of the Frankopan dukes. Gacka also provided habitat to stone crayfish which disappeared in 1931 due to crab plague. Later, numerous other fish species were introduced into the Gacka, while other made their way to the river through the canal built between Gacka and the Lika rivers to serve the Hydro Electric Power Plant. To be found in the Gacka today are also the rainbow trout, grayling, carp, tench, roach, chub, and pumpkinseed. These introduced species have disturbed the biological balance and reduced the purity of water. Trout in the Gacka grow very fast (about five times faster than in other karst rivers) and are known among anglers throughout the globe.
Sokolac is a castle in Brinje, Croatia. It is named after the Croatian word for hawk (sokol), which appears on the town's coat of arms. It dates back to medieval times, while the town was held by the noble Frankopan and Gorjanski families. The castle was part of an important medieval fortified city held by Frankopan family. Sokolac Castle was an extremely grand building, dominated by the powerful perpendiculars of the entry tower, and the Chapel of the Holy Trinity. The entry into the burg was through a square, three-storey tower, the façades of which were relieved with lesenes linked at the top with blind arcades, making it a unique specimen in the whole of Central Europe.
Sokolac Castle
Sokolac is a castle in Brinje, Croatia. It is named after the Croatian word for hawk (sokol), which appears on the town's coat of arms. It dates back to medieval times, while the town was held by the noble Frankopan and Gorjanski families. The castle was part of an important medieval fortified city held by Frankopan family. Sokolac Castle was an extremely grand building, dominated by the powerful perpendiculars of the entry tower, and the Chapel of the Holy Trinity. The entry into the burg was through a square, three-storey tower, the façades of which were relieved with lesenes linked at the top with blind arcades, making it a unique specimen in the whole of Central Europe.
t was built by Croatian army general Ivan Lenković, a captain of the Uskoks, on the hill Nehaj.[1][2] Finished in 1558, it was built on the remains of ruined churches, monasteries and houses which were situated outside of the walls of Senj.[1] These buildings were scrapped since it was concluded that they would not survive anyway if they were outside the city walls, as the Ottomans would loot them or use them as housing during sieges. The fortress was mainly built to fight the Ottoman Empire, and to be used as a base for the Uskoks. The Uskoks (who built and inhabited the fort) were great enemies of the Ottomans, as they had previously taken another city called Klis, where the Uskoks used to reside. Before the fortress was built, Senj had been besieged three times, but none succeeded; after the fort was built, the fortress or Senj were not attacked again. However, the Uskoks were also known to be the enemies of the Venetians, as the Venetians were quite aggressive toward the Croatian coastal cities. The Venetians viewed them as pirates, since they would plunder and sink their ships. They were known to travel as far as Istria and plunder Venetian ships. In fact, the Venetians were so disturbed by the Uskok attacks that they had a war with Austria (which Senj was a part of at that time). One of the peace terms was the banishment of the Uskoks. The Emperor did banish the Uskoks and that was their end. However, during the hundred years that they were active they stood by their oath of vengeance towards all their enemies which they took when their former fortress of Klis was conquered by the Ottomans in 1537. The Uskoks and the Fortress successfully held the border and kept invaders away, as the fortress was never conquered or torn down. In 1592, a strong Ottoman army invaded Croatia hoping to capture Senj. Led by Telli Hasan Pasha, the beylerbey of Bosnia, the Ottomans managed to capture a number of Uskok settlements, killing and enslaving the population. However, the army was routed and dispersed in the following year. Austria was involved in war with the Ottomans and the Venetian admiral Giovanni Bembo blockaded Trieste and Rijeka (Fiume), where the pirates forwarded their booty for sale. They also erected two forts to command the passages from Senj to the open sea. In 1600, the Prince of Senj was Mickael Radic. The Duke Micheal Radic, appointed as Prince of Senj on 1 December 1600 by King Rudolf in Graz. Prince Radic was Prince of Senj. Radic family is a Native noble family from Lika region; members of the family were Uskok military leaders at the headquarters in Senj.
31
locals recommend
Nehaj Fortress
3 Nehajski put
31
locals recommend
t was built by Croatian army general Ivan Lenković, a captain of the Uskoks, on the hill Nehaj.[1][2] Finished in 1558, it was built on the remains of ruined churches, monasteries and houses which were situated outside of the walls of Senj.[1] These buildings were scrapped since it was concluded that they would not survive anyway if they were outside the city walls, as the Ottomans would loot them or use them as housing during sieges. The fortress was mainly built to fight the Ottoman Empire, and to be used as a base for the Uskoks. The Uskoks (who built and inhabited the fort) were great enemies of the Ottomans, as they had previously taken another city called Klis, where the Uskoks used to reside. Before the fortress was built, Senj had been besieged three times, but none succeeded; after the fort was built, the fortress or Senj were not attacked again. However, the Uskoks were also known to be the enemies of the Venetians, as the Venetians were quite aggressive toward the Croatian coastal cities. The Venetians viewed them as pirates, since they would plunder and sink their ships. They were known to travel as far as Istria and plunder Venetian ships. In fact, the Venetians were so disturbed by the Uskok attacks that they had a war with Austria (which Senj was a part of at that time). One of the peace terms was the banishment of the Uskoks. The Emperor did banish the Uskoks and that was their end. However, during the hundred years that they were active they stood by their oath of vengeance towards all their enemies which they took when their former fortress of Klis was conquered by the Ottomans in 1537. The Uskoks and the Fortress successfully held the border and kept invaders away, as the fortress was never conquered or torn down. In 1592, a strong Ottoman army invaded Croatia hoping to capture Senj. Led by Telli Hasan Pasha, the beylerbey of Bosnia, the Ottomans managed to capture a number of Uskok settlements, killing and enslaving the population. However, the army was routed and dispersed in the following year. Austria was involved in war with the Ottomans and the Venetian admiral Giovanni Bembo blockaded Trieste and Rijeka (Fiume), where the pirates forwarded their booty for sale. They also erected two forts to command the passages from Senj to the open sea. In 1600, the Prince of Senj was Mickael Radic. The Duke Micheal Radic, appointed as Prince of Senj on 1 December 1600 by King Rudolf in Graz. Prince Radic was Prince of Senj. Radic family is a Native noble family from Lika region; members of the family were Uskok military leaders at the headquarters in Senj.

City advice

Book before you go
Plitvice lakes
https://ticketing.np-plitvicka-jezera.hr/