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Adelaide and surrounding areas

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Adelaide and surrounding areas

Sightseeing
This is a beautiful garden especially in Spring and Autumn
Mount Lofty Botanic Gardens Upper Carpark
This is a beautiful garden especially in Spring and Autumn
The South Australian Museum is a natural history museum and research institution in Adelaide, South Australia, founded in 1856 and owned by the Government of South Australia. It occupies a complex of buildings on North Terrace in the cultural precinct of the Adelaide Parklands. Plans are under way to split its Australian Aboriginal cultural collection (the largest in the world), some of which will be housed in a new building housing these along with other works of art, in a new National Gallery for Aboriginal Art and Cultures.
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South Australian Museum
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The South Australian Museum is a natural history museum and research institution in Adelaide, South Australia, founded in 1856 and owned by the Government of South Australia. It occupies a complex of buildings on North Terrace in the cultural precinct of the Adelaide Parklands. Plans are under way to split its Australian Aboriginal cultural collection (the largest in the world), some of which will be housed in a new building housing these along with other works of art, in a new National Gallery for Aboriginal Art and Cultures.
The Art Gallery of South Australia (AGSA), established as the National Gallery of South Australia in 1881, is located in Adelaide. It is the most significant visual arts museum in the Australian state of South Australia. It has a collection of almost 45,000 works of art, making it the second largest state art collection in Australia (after the National Gallery of Victoria). As part of North Terrace cultural precinct, the Gallery is flanked by the South Australian Museum to the west and the University of Adelaide to the east. As well as its permanent collection, which is especially renowned for its collection of Australian art, AGSA hosts the annual Festival of Contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art known as Tarnanthi, displays a number of visiting exhibitions each year and also contributes travelling exhibitions to regional galleries. European (including British), Asian and North American art are also well represented in its collections.
Art Gallery
The Art Gallery of South Australia (AGSA), established as the National Gallery of South Australia in 1881, is located in Adelaide. It is the most significant visual arts museum in the Australian state of South Australia. It has a collection of almost 45,000 works of art, making it the second largest state art collection in Australia (after the National Gallery of Victoria). As part of North Terrace cultural precinct, the Gallery is flanked by the South Australian Museum to the west and the University of Adelaide to the east. As well as its permanent collection, which is especially renowned for its collection of Australian art, AGSA hosts the annual Festival of Contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art known as Tarnanthi, displays a number of visiting exhibitions each year and also contributes travelling exhibitions to regional galleries. European (including British), Asian and North American art are also well represented in its collections.
Morialta Conservation Park, formerly the Morialta Falls Reserve and the Morialta Falls National Pleasure Resort, is a protected area 10 km north-east of Adelaide city centre, in the state of South Australia, Australia. The park is in a rugged bush environment, with a narrow gorge set with three waterfalls, bounded by steep ridges and cliffs. The park caters to many activities, including bushwalking, bird watching and rock climbing.
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Morialta Conservation Park
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Morialta Conservation Park, formerly the Morialta Falls Reserve and the Morialta Falls National Pleasure Resort, is a protected area 10 km north-east of Adelaide city centre, in the state of South Australia, Australia. The park is in a rugged bush environment, with a narrow gorge set with three waterfalls, bounded by steep ridges and cliffs. The park caters to many activities, including bushwalking, bird watching and rock climbing.
Cleland Conservation Park is a protected area located in the Adelaide Hills, South Australia about 22 kilometres (14 mi) south-east of the Adelaide city centre. Cleland Conservation Park conserves a significant area of natural bushland on the Adelaide Hills face and includes the internationally popular Cleland Wildlife Park and the popular tourist destinations of Mount Lofty summit and Waterfall Gully. It is maintained by the South Australian Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources. The conservation park was named for Sir John Burton Cleland The conservation park was named for Sir John Burton Cleland (1878-1971), a renowned naturalist, microbiologist, mycologist and ornithologist, and member of the Royal Society of South Australia. After a career in medicine and pathology, Cleland became keenly interested in wildlife conservation.[4] The conservation park occupies land in the gazetted suburbs of Cleland, Crafers and Waterfall Gully.[5]
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Cleland Conservation Park
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Cleland Conservation Park is a protected area located in the Adelaide Hills, South Australia about 22 kilometres (14 mi) south-east of the Adelaide city centre. Cleland Conservation Park conserves a significant area of natural bushland on the Adelaide Hills face and includes the internationally popular Cleland Wildlife Park and the popular tourist destinations of Mount Lofty summit and Waterfall Gully. It is maintained by the South Australian Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources. The conservation park was named for Sir John Burton Cleland The conservation park was named for Sir John Burton Cleland (1878-1971), a renowned naturalist, microbiologist, mycologist and ornithologist, and member of the Royal Society of South Australia. After a career in medicine and pathology, Cleland became keenly interested in wildlife conservation.[4] The conservation park occupies land in the gazetted suburbs of Cleland, Crafers and Waterfall Gully.[5]
Carrick Hill is a publicly accessible historic property at the foot of the Adelaide Hills, in the suburb of Springfield, It was the Adelaide home of Sir Edward "Bill" Hayward and his wife Lady Ursula (née Barr-Smith), and contains a large collection of drawings, sculptures, antiques and paintings. Completed in 1939 and built in the style of an English manor, it is one of the few period homes in Australia to have survived with its grounds undiminished and most of its original contents intact. After being bequeathed to the state of South Australia upon Sir Edward's death in 1983, since 1985 it has been managed by the board of the Carrick Hill Trust, a statutory corporation which as of 2019 reports to the Department of the Premier and Cabinet.
Carrick Hill Drive
Carrick Hill is a publicly accessible historic property at the foot of the Adelaide Hills, in the suburb of Springfield, It was the Adelaide home of Sir Edward "Bill" Hayward and his wife Lady Ursula (née Barr-Smith), and contains a large collection of drawings, sculptures, antiques and paintings. Completed in 1939 and built in the style of an English manor, it is one of the few period homes in Australia to have survived with its grounds undiminished and most of its original contents intact. After being bequeathed to the state of South Australia upon Sir Edward's death in 1983, since 1985 it has been managed by the board of the Carrick Hill Trust, a statutory corporation which as of 2019 reports to the Department of the Premier and Cabinet.
This popular walk is short and sweet. With a cafe at each end, a well made path and regular seating, this walk is popular for a reason. On almost any morning of the year the trail attracts a range of people: some casually walking, others using it as a training walk, some runners, and others with heavy-simulated packs training for distant hiking locations like Nepal. As the walk involves some steep sections, the time taken to walk the trail can vary significantly. On a busy weekend, car parking at Waterfall Gully can be limited. Starting hiking from Mt Lofty instead of Waterfall Gully can be a good way to use the downhill as a warm up, to super charge your up-hill efforts.
Mount Lofty Walking Trail
This popular walk is short and sweet. With a cafe at each end, a well made path and regular seating, this walk is popular for a reason. On almost any morning of the year the trail attracts a range of people: some casually walking, others using it as a training walk, some runners, and others with heavy-simulated packs training for distant hiking locations like Nepal. As the walk involves some steep sections, the time taken to walk the trail can vary significantly. On a busy weekend, car parking at Waterfall Gully can be limited. Starting hiking from Mt Lofty instead of Waterfall Gully can be a good way to use the downhill as a warm up, to super charge your up-hill efforts.
Adelaide Zoo is Australia's second oldest zoo (after Melbourne Zoo), and it is operated on a non-profit basis. It is located in the parklands just north of the city centre of Adelaide. It is administered by the Royal Zoological Society of South Australia Incorporated which is a full institutional member of the Zoo and Aquarium Association and the World Association of Zoos and Aquariums and which also administers the Monarto Safari Park near Murray Bridge. The zoo houses about 300 native and exotic species, with over 3,000 animals on site. The zoo's most recent enclosures are in the second phase of the South-East Asia exhibit, known as Immersion, providing visitors with the experience of walking through the jungle, with Sumatran tigers and orangutans seemingly within reach. Five buildings within the zoo have been listed as state heritage places on the South Australian Heritage Register including the front entrance on Frome Road and the former Elephant House. The zoo is also a botanical garden and the grounds contain significant exotic and native flora, including a Moreton Bay fig planted in 1877. The giant panda exhibit, which opened in December 2009, is home to two giant pandas, Wang Wang and Funi, which will remain at the zoo until at least 2024.
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Adelaide Zoo
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Adelaide Zoo is Australia's second oldest zoo (after Melbourne Zoo), and it is operated on a non-profit basis. It is located in the parklands just north of the city centre of Adelaide. It is administered by the Royal Zoological Society of South Australia Incorporated which is a full institutional member of the Zoo and Aquarium Association and the World Association of Zoos and Aquariums and which also administers the Monarto Safari Park near Murray Bridge. The zoo houses about 300 native and exotic species, with over 3,000 animals on site. The zoo's most recent enclosures are in the second phase of the South-East Asia exhibit, known as Immersion, providing visitors with the experience of walking through the jungle, with Sumatran tigers and orangutans seemingly within reach. Five buildings within the zoo have been listed as state heritage places on the South Australian Heritage Register including the front entrance on Frome Road and the former Elephant House. The zoo is also a botanical garden and the grounds contain significant exotic and native flora, including a Moreton Bay fig planted in 1877. The giant panda exhibit, which opened in December 2009, is home to two giant pandas, Wang Wang and Funi, which will remain at the zoo until at least 2024.
The Adelaide Botanic Garden is a 51-hectare (130-acre) public garden at the north-east corner of the Adelaide city centre, in the Adelaide Park Lands. It encompasses a fenced garden on North Terrace (between Lot Fourteen, the site of the old Royal Adelaide Hospital, and the National Wine Centre) and behind it the Botanic Park (adjacent to the Adelaide Zoo). Work was begun on the site in 1855, with its official opening to the public on 4 October 1857. The Adelaide Botanic Garden and adjacent State Herbarium of South Australia, together with the Wittunga and Mt Lofty Botanic Gardens, are administered by the Board of the Botanic Gardens and State Herbarium, a State Government statutory authority.
Botanic Street
The Adelaide Botanic Garden is a 51-hectare (130-acre) public garden at the north-east corner of the Adelaide city centre, in the Adelaide Park Lands. It encompasses a fenced garden on North Terrace (between Lot Fourteen, the site of the old Royal Adelaide Hospital, and the National Wine Centre) and behind it the Botanic Park (adjacent to the Adelaide Zoo). Work was begun on the site in 1855, with its official opening to the public on 4 October 1857. The Adelaide Botanic Garden and adjacent State Herbarium of South Australia, together with the Wittunga and Mt Lofty Botanic Gardens, are administered by the Board of the Botanic Gardens and State Herbarium, a State Government statutory authority.
Adelaide Gaol was an Australian prison located in the Park Lands of Adelaide, in the state of South Australia. The gaol was the first permanent one in South Australia and operated from 1841 until 1988. The Gaol is one of the two oldest buildings still standing in South Australia, the other being Government House which was built at the same time. The prison is now a museum, tourist attraction and function centre. The Gaol is open for self-guided tours 7 days a week from 10am to 4pm (last entry 3pm). Ghost tours also operate at night. For further details visit: www.adelaidegaol.sa.gov.au
Gaol Road
Adelaide Gaol was an Australian prison located in the Park Lands of Adelaide, in the state of South Australia. The gaol was the first permanent one in South Australia and operated from 1841 until 1988. The Gaol is one of the two oldest buildings still standing in South Australia, the other being Government House which was built at the same time. The prison is now a museum, tourist attraction and function centre. The Gaol is open for self-guided tours 7 days a week from 10am to 4pm (last entry 3pm). Ghost tours also operate at night. For further details visit: www.adelaidegaol.sa.gov.au
Gorge Wildlife Park is a privately-owned sanctuary in the Australian state of South Australia. It is at Cudlee Creek in the Adelaide Hills and continues to be operated by the same family that established it in 1965. It is 30 km northeast of Adelaide. The park provides contact with a range of Australian native animals as well as exhibits of Australian and exotic animals and birds. A feature is the opportunity for visitors to hold a koala. Gorge WIldlife Park is involved in protection and preservation of some endangered species such as the Brush-tailed rock-wallaby (Petrogale penicillata).
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Gorge Wildlife Park
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Gorge Wildlife Park is a privately-owned sanctuary in the Australian state of South Australia. It is at Cudlee Creek in the Adelaide Hills and continues to be operated by the same family that established it in 1965. It is 30 km northeast of Adelaide. The park provides contact with a range of Australian native animals as well as exhibits of Australian and exotic animals and birds. A feature is the opportunity for visitors to hold a koala. Gorge WIldlife Park is involved in protection and preservation of some endangered species such as the Brush-tailed rock-wallaby (Petrogale penicillata).
The garden was originally designed by council staff, in consultation with the Adelaide Japanse community, after Adelaide and Himeji entered a sister city relationship in 1982. However, aspects of the garden's design were criticised, including its cyclone fence and lack of attention to detail. In 1986, Japanese landscape designer Yoshitaka Kumada drew up plans to refurbish the garden, which included the purchase of trees and shrubs from Melbourne, and stones from near Adelaide. After a Shinto ground-breaking ceremony in May 1987, the works began, with Kumada himself overseeing the project. The little lake was reshaped, the Sea of Sand was expanded, and the garden filled with carefully selected plants and ornamentation to complement the granite Okunoin lantern gifted by the City of Himeji in 1985. The redesign was finally implemented completely in 1989, but Kumada continued to visit each year during the early 1990s, tweaking details and teaching techniques to the council gardeners.
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Adelaide Himeji Garden
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The garden was originally designed by council staff, in consultation with the Adelaide Japanse community, after Adelaide and Himeji entered a sister city relationship in 1982. However, aspects of the garden's design were criticised, including its cyclone fence and lack of attention to detail. In 1986, Japanese landscape designer Yoshitaka Kumada drew up plans to refurbish the garden, which included the purchase of trees and shrubs from Melbourne, and stones from near Adelaide. After a Shinto ground-breaking ceremony in May 1987, the works began, with Kumada himself overseeing the project. The little lake was reshaped, the Sea of Sand was expanded, and the garden filled with carefully selected plants and ornamentation to complement the granite Okunoin lantern gifted by the City of Himeji in 1985. The redesign was finally implemented completely in 1989, but Kumada continued to visit each year during the early 1990s, tweaking details and teaching techniques to the council gardeners.
Adelaide Oval is a sports ground in Adelaide, located in the parklands between the city centre and North Adelaide. The venue is predominantly used for cricket and Australian rules football, but has also played host to rugby league, rugby union, soccer, tennis among other sports as well as regularly being used to hold concerts. Austadiums.com described Adelaide Oval as being "one of the most picturesque Test cricket grounds in Australia, if not the world". After the completion of the ground‘s most recent redevelopment in 2014, sports journalist Gerard Whateley described the venue as being "the most perfect piece of modern architecture because it's a thoroughly contemporary stadium with all the character that it's had in the past". Adelaide Oval has been headquarters to the South Australian Cricket Association (SACA) since 1871 and South Australian National Football League (SANFL) since 2014.[6] The stadium is managed by the Adelaide Oval Stadium Management Authority (AOSMA). Its record crowd for cricket was 55,317 for the Second Ashes Test on 2 December 2017[1] and its record crowd for an Australian rules football match was 62,543 at the 1965 SANFL Grand Final between Port Adelaide and Sturt.
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Adelaide
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Adelaide Oval is a sports ground in Adelaide, located in the parklands between the city centre and North Adelaide. The venue is predominantly used for cricket and Australian rules football, but has also played host to rugby league, rugby union, soccer, tennis among other sports as well as regularly being used to hold concerts. Austadiums.com described Adelaide Oval as being "one of the most picturesque Test cricket grounds in Australia, if not the world". After the completion of the ground‘s most recent redevelopment in 2014, sports journalist Gerard Whateley described the venue as being "the most perfect piece of modern architecture because it's a thoroughly contemporary stadium with all the character that it's had in the past". Adelaide Oval has been headquarters to the South Australian Cricket Association (SACA) since 1871 and South Australian National Football League (SANFL) since 2014.[6] The stadium is managed by the Adelaide Oval Stadium Management Authority (AOSMA). Its record crowd for cricket was 55,317 for the Second Ashes Test on 2 December 2017[1] and its record crowd for an Australian rules football match was 62,543 at the 1965 SANFL Grand Final between Port Adelaide and Sturt.
City/town information
Great Tourist Village with food, wine and shopping
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Hahndorf
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Great Tourist Village with food, wine and shopping
Adelaide is South Australia’s cosmopolitan coastal capital. Its ring of parkland on the River Torrens is home to renowned museums such as the Art Gallery of South Australia, displaying expansive collections including noted Indigenous art, and the South Australian Museum, devoted to natural history. The city's Adelaide Festival is an annual international arts gathering with spin-offs including fringe and film events.
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Adelaide
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Adelaide is South Australia’s cosmopolitan coastal capital. Its ring of parkland on the River Torrens is home to renowned museums such as the Art Gallery of South Australia, displaying expansive collections including noted Indigenous art, and the South Australian Museum, devoted to natural history. The city's Adelaide Festival is an annual international arts gathering with spin-offs including fringe and film events.
Bayside Glenelg draws families to its long, sandy beach and the Beachouse amusement centre, with waterslides, rides and arcade games. The Bay Discovery Centre in the 1870s Town Hall has local history exhibits including a vintage swimwear collection, and dolphin-spotting cruises cast off from nearby Holdfast Marina. Laid-back pubs, organic cafes, global eateries and indie boutiques give the area a trendy vibe.
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Glenelg
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Bayside Glenelg draws families to its long, sandy beach and the Beachouse amusement centre, with waterslides, rides and arcade games. The Bay Discovery Centre in the 1870s Town Hall has local history exhibits including a vintage swimwear collection, and dolphin-spotting cruises cast off from nearby Holdfast Marina. Laid-back pubs, organic cafes, global eateries and indie boutiques give the area a trendy vibe.
Once the former home of explorer Captain Charles Sturt who built his family home ‘The Grange’ in the area in 1840. With the land was subsequently subdivided to become the village of Grange that we know today, Grange is a beach side suburb lying just north of Henley Beach. The Grange Golf Club also located in the area is one of South Australia’s premier sporting venues with two internationally rated 18 hole golf courses all just 20 minutes from the CBD.
Grange
Once the former home of explorer Captain Charles Sturt who built his family home ‘The Grange’ in the area in 1840. With the land was subsequently subdivided to become the village of Grange that we know today, Grange is a beach side suburb lying just north of Henley Beach. The Grange Golf Club also located in the area is one of South Australia’s premier sporting venues with two internationally rated 18 hole golf courses all just 20 minutes from the CBD.
There’s plenty to see and do right in Henley. You can swim, paddle, fish or sun yourself on this wide and sandy beach. Henley Square is right on the beach and is a destination for locals because of its beachside location and its fabulous variety of restaurants, cafes and bars in a Mediterranean style setting. There are water fountains for kids to splash in, uniquely designed wave-shaped timber seats leading right up to the jetty, large grassed areas for a picnic, and a stunning futuristic beach shower that you will want a photo under! Enjoy live entertainment at a number of venues at Henley Square or sit in the sun with a coffee or drink and then take a walk along the shopping strip to indulge in some retail therapy and pampering. If you feel a little more active, stroll along the coastal path all the way to Grange Beach. Or you can walk the Linear Path – right into Adelaide. Henley Beach is only 20 minutes from Adelaide central.
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Henley Beach
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There’s plenty to see and do right in Henley. You can swim, paddle, fish or sun yourself on this wide and sandy beach. Henley Square is right on the beach and is a destination for locals because of its beachside location and its fabulous variety of restaurants, cafes and bars in a Mediterranean style setting. There are water fountains for kids to splash in, uniquely designed wave-shaped timber seats leading right up to the jetty, large grassed areas for a picnic, and a stunning futuristic beach shower that you will want a photo under! Enjoy live entertainment at a number of venues at Henley Square or sit in the sun with a coffee or drink and then take a walk along the shopping strip to indulge in some retail therapy and pampering. If you feel a little more active, stroll along the coastal path all the way to Grange Beach. Or you can walk the Linear Path – right into Adelaide. Henley Beach is only 20 minutes from Adelaide central.
Food scene
The Clare Valley is a valley located in South Australia about 100 kilometres (62 miles) north of Adelaide. It is the river valley formed by the Hutt River but is also strongly associated with the roughly parallel Hill River. The valley is traversed by the Horrocks Highway and the towns in the valley along that route from south to north are Auburn, Leasingham, Watervale, Penwortham, Sevenhill and Clare. The geographical feature has given rise to the Clare Valley wine region designation, a notable wine growing region of Australia. Most wineries now have restaurants many with amazing views.
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Clare Valley
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The Clare Valley is a valley located in South Australia about 100 kilometres (62 miles) north of Adelaide. It is the river valley formed by the Hutt River but is also strongly associated with the roughly parallel Hill River. The valley is traversed by the Horrocks Highway and the towns in the valley along that route from south to north are Auburn, Leasingham, Watervale, Penwortham, Sevenhill and Clare. The geographical feature has given rise to the Clare Valley wine region designation, a notable wine growing region of Australia. Most wineries now have restaurants many with amazing views.
The Barossa Valley is a renowned wine-producing region northeast of Adelaide (60km away), in South Australia. The area encompasses towns such as Tanunda, Angaston and Nuriootpa, and an array of high-profile wineries offering tours and cellar-door tastings. Shiraz grapes are the local speciality. Many wineries now have great restaurants many with amazing views. The stone cottages and Lutheran churches throughout the region are testament to a 19th-century wave of German settlers.
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Barossa Valley
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The Barossa Valley is a renowned wine-producing region northeast of Adelaide (60km away), in South Australia. The area encompasses towns such as Tanunda, Angaston and Nuriootpa, and an array of high-profile wineries offering tours and cellar-door tastings. Shiraz grapes are the local speciality. Many wineries now have great restaurants many with amazing views. The stone cottages and Lutheran churches throughout the region are testament to a 19th-century wave of German settlers.
Only 45 minutes south of Adelaide in South Australia, McLaren Vale is home to sustainable wine growing, world-class wines and culinary experiences, as well as pristine natural attractions and unparalleled tourism offerings. South Australia's viticultural origins began in McLaren Vale and our region's Mediterranean climate continues to drive our region's wine style and diverse food culture. Best known for Shiraz, McLaren Vale also excels in the production of ultra-premium Grenache and Cabernet. Spanish and Italian varieties such as Fiano, Vermentino, Tempranillo and Sangiovese are also very well suited climatically and provide wine lovers with yet another layer of discovery. Over one third of our cellar doors offer local produce as part of the tasting experience - from high-end, starred restaurants to casual platters - there is a wine and food combination to suit any taste. Our region's 30 kilometres of breath-taking coastline and ranges define McLaren Vale's boundaries, and the distinct landscapes and environment within. McLaren Vale's collaborative and generous nature, unique combination of world class wines and produce - both on the farm and on the plate - with a beach lifestyle, ensures that our region truly offers a unique, welcoming experience.
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McLaren Vale
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Only 45 minutes south of Adelaide in South Australia, McLaren Vale is home to sustainable wine growing, world-class wines and culinary experiences, as well as pristine natural attractions and unparalleled tourism offerings. South Australia's viticultural origins began in McLaren Vale and our region's Mediterranean climate continues to drive our region's wine style and diverse food culture. Best known for Shiraz, McLaren Vale also excels in the production of ultra-premium Grenache and Cabernet. Spanish and Italian varieties such as Fiano, Vermentino, Tempranillo and Sangiovese are also very well suited climatically and provide wine lovers with yet another layer of discovery. Over one third of our cellar doors offer local produce as part of the tasting experience - from high-end, starred restaurants to casual platters - there is a wine and food combination to suit any taste. Our region's 30 kilometres of breath-taking coastline and ranges define McLaren Vale's boundaries, and the distinct landscapes and environment within. McLaren Vale's collaborative and generous nature, unique combination of world class wines and produce - both on the farm and on the plate - with a beach lifestyle, ensures that our region truly offers a unique, welcoming experience.
The idea to build the d'Arenberg Cube came to Chester Osborn in 2003. Inspired by the complexities and puzzles of winemaking, Chester created the idea of a cube-shaped building. Each of the five levels have been carefully designed to entice and excite the senses, including features such as a wine sensory room, a virtual fermenter, a 360degree video room, and many other tactile experiences. Visitors are encouraged to explore the Alternate Realities Museum, located on the ground floor, and view the many art installations on display.
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The d'Arenberg Cube
58 Osborn Rd
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The idea to build the d'Arenberg Cube came to Chester Osborn in 2003. Inspired by the complexities and puzzles of winemaking, Chester created the idea of a cube-shaped building. Each of the five levels have been carefully designed to entice and excite the senses, including features such as a wine sensory room, a virtual fermenter, a 360degree video room, and many other tactile experiences. Visitors are encouraged to explore the Alternate Realities Museum, located on the ground floor, and view the many art installations on display.
The National Wine Centre of Australia, Adelaide is a truly special place for you to experience. Its unique surroundings, nestled in the heart of the city’s Botanic Gardens. Daily wine tasting of the regions wines.
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National Wine Centre
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The National Wine Centre of Australia, Adelaide is a truly special place for you to experience. Its unique surroundings, nestled in the heart of the city’s Botanic Gardens. Daily wine tasting of the regions wines.

City advice

Don't miss
Adelaide Centre Market
The Adelaide Central Market is one of the largest undercover fresh produce markets in the Southern Hemisphere, with 1 million kilograms of fresh produce delivered to the Market and sold every month. The Market offers a huge range of fresh food including fruit and vegetables, meat and poultry, seafood, cheeses, bakery, smallgoods and health foods, along with some of Adelaide's most frequented cafes and eateries. With more than 9.5 million visitations every year (up half a million from 2017), the Adelaide Central Market remains the food mecca for multicultural cuisine and fresh produce. In 2019,
Don't miss
Womadelaide
WOMADelaide is an annual four-day festival of Music, Arts and Dance, which was first held in 1992 in Botanic Park, Adelaide, South Australia. Part of the WOMAD festivals organisation, WOMAD aims to excite, to create, to inform and to highlight awareness of the worth and potential of a multicultural society.The festival encourages people to experience the music of cultures other than their own as a way of developing global understanding, and aims to entertain all age groups and people from all backgrounds. WOMAD has won the Helpmann Award for Best Contemporary Music Festival in 2008 & 2016.
Don't miss
World class Events
South Australia's world-class events showcase our exceptional food and wine, sport, art and vibrant city life. In the space of a few months, Adelaide is host to the massive Adelaide Fringe, Adelaide Festival, WOMADelaide, Santos Tour Down Under (bike race), National Pharmacies Christmas Pageant and Superloop Adelaide 500 (car race). The party doesn’t stop in Adelaide though. Our regions will find any excuse for a celebration, with events and festivals showing-off the best of our state's food, wine, fashion, art and design all year-round.
Don't miss
Glenelg Tram Line
The Glenelg tram line is a tram/light rail line in Adelaide. Apart from a short street-running section in Glenelg, the line has its own reservation, with minimal interference from road traffic. The service is free in the city centre and along the route to the Adelaide Entertainment Centre in Hindmarsh. The service is also free along the length of Jetty Road, Glenelg to Moseley Square. Three routes in total operate on the network: Glenelg to the Royal Adelaide Hospital with select peak services that continue to the Adelaide Entertainment Centre; Glenelg to the Adelaide Festival Centre.
Getting around
Free Adelaide City Transport
Adelaide Metro offers free travel options within Adelaide City and North Adelaide? It’s a fabulous way to explore the city – for free! The City Connector buses travel in both directions around the city and you can hop on and off as you please at various stops along the way. Young children especially love the experience of riding on public transport and it’s a great way to take in the city streets and discover buildings and businesses you may not have seen before. The city and North Adelaide every 30 minutes, seven days a week, travel the main city destinations every 30 minutes.
Don't miss
Adelaide Art Festival
The Adelaide Festival of Arts, also known as the Adelaide Festival, is an annual arts festival held in March. Started in 1960, it is considered to be one of the world's major celebrations of the arts, and a pre-eminent cultural event in Australia. It comprises many events, usually including opera, theatre, dance, classical and contemporary music, cabaret, literature, visual art and new media The Adelaide Festival Centre and River Torrens usually form the nucleus of the event, and in recent years Elder Park has played host to opening ceremonies.