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Ribaute Holiday HOme

Michelle

Ribaute Holiday HOme

Sightseeing
One of the most beautiful villages in France and our nearest village (and the closest shops, cafes & restaurants). Lagrasse is famous for its Abbey, bridges and covered market. The village is now home to a community of artists & potters. They also host music festivals and antique markets each ear (usually in the summer). It’s also a great spot to go swimming – head through town, towards the abbey and you’ll find a great spot under the bridge to swim.
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Lagrasse
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One of the most beautiful villages in France and our nearest village (and the closest shops, cafes & restaurants). Lagrasse is famous for its Abbey, bridges and covered market. The village is now home to a community of artists & potters. They also host music festivals and antique markets each ear (usually in the summer). It’s also a great spot to go swimming – head through town, towards the abbey and you’ll find a great spot under the bridge to swim.
Carcassonne: This is our closest city and airport. The area is divided into an old a new town. The old town is known as La Cité ; this fortified medieval town looks like something from a fairy-tale with battlements, turrets and even a drawbridge. There is plenty of pay-and-display parking near the entrance. Entering La Cité on foot, you’ll find yourself winding through a maze of cobbled streets and alleyways with beautiful shops, restaurants and historic sites. It is well worth taking the tour of the cite walls where you can climb the battlements to see spectacular views across the Aude valley. The new town is also very interesting with super shopping and events throughout the summer (and winter). There are lovely restaurants and a maze of lovely shops to visit. Well worth spending a day exploring the Place Carnot area where you can also experience the fresh food market. Carcassonne is our closest airport where flights arrive most days (during the summer) from Stanstead. In the winter months, a reduced service runs with flights arriving and departing 3 days per/week.
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Carcassonne
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Carcassonne: This is our closest city and airport. The area is divided into an old a new town. The old town is known as La Cité ; this fortified medieval town looks like something from a fairy-tale with battlements, turrets and even a drawbridge. There is plenty of pay-and-display parking near the entrance. Entering La Cité on foot, you’ll find yourself winding through a maze of cobbled streets and alleyways with beautiful shops, restaurants and historic sites. It is well worth taking the tour of the cite walls where you can climb the battlements to see spectacular views across the Aude valley. The new town is also very interesting with super shopping and events throughout the summer (and winter). There are lovely restaurants and a maze of lovely shops to visit. Well worth spending a day exploring the Place Carnot area where you can also experience the fresh food market. Carcassonne is our closest airport where flights arrive most days (during the summer) from Stanstead. In the winter months, a reduced service runs with flights arriving and departing 3 days per/week.
Bugarach: The tiny French village (population 200) that new age fanatics decided would be the only place on earth to survive the Mayan apocalypse. The poor mayor made an international plea to “Please stop coming here!” in an effort to stem the flow of Americans convinced they’d survive Armageddon in Bugarach. Followers still believe the nearby ‘upside down mountain’ has mystical powers and may house a UFO. By car – 1hr, 25min (drive via Termes to see the pretty village dominated by the hill-top Chateau). For a quirky day out, team Bugarach with Rennes la Chateau with its even stranger history (see below).
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Bugarach
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Bugarach: The tiny French village (population 200) that new age fanatics decided would be the only place on earth to survive the Mayan apocalypse. The poor mayor made an international plea to “Please stop coming here!” in an effort to stem the flow of Americans convinced they’d survive Armageddon in Bugarach. Followers still believe the nearby ‘upside down mountain’ has mystical powers and may house a UFO. By car – 1hr, 25min (drive via Termes to see the pretty village dominated by the hill-top Chateau). For a quirky day out, team Bugarach with Rennes la Chateau with its even stranger history (see below).
Collioure: An absolutely stunning sea-side town which lies at the foot of the Pyrenees and just a few miles north of the border to Spain. Top tip: take a morning drive down the coast and arrive in Collioure in time for lunch. Note: most restaurants will not serve food after 2pm so 12pm – 1pm is the best time to grab a seafront table.
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Collioure
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Collioure: An absolutely stunning sea-side town which lies at the foot of the Pyrenees and just a few miles north of the border to Spain. Top tip: take a morning drive down the coast and arrive in Collioure in time for lunch. Note: most restaurants will not serve food after 2pm so 12pm – 1pm is the best time to grab a seafront table.
Gruissan: Originally, a fishing village about 20mnins from Narbonne which is set on a hill between two lagoons with narrow alleyways encircling the ruins of a 12th century tower. There is now also a modern marina and apartments making it a favourite spot for sailing.
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Gruissan
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Gruissan: Originally, a fishing village about 20mnins from Narbonne which is set on a hill between two lagoons with narrow alleyways encircling the ruins of a 12th century tower. There is now also a modern marina and apartments making it a favourite spot for sailing.
Limoux: Famous for its Blanquette de Limoux; a local champagne (wonderful!), Limoux is a large town on the Aude river about 20km south of Carcassonne (and on the way to Quillan). Limoux sits on the edge of the river Aude.
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Limoux
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Limoux: Famous for its Blanquette de Limoux; a local champagne (wonderful!), Limoux is a large town on the Aude river about 20km south of Carcassonne (and on the way to Quillan). Limoux sits on the edge of the river Aude.
Minerve: A stunning town made up of pretty stone houses, charming cobbled streets and perched high on a thin sliver of land with a river running on both sides. It is accessible only via a high bridge. It was the site of a famous siege in the mediaeval age with Cathars valiantly defending the town and Catholics catapulting rocks across the ravine.
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Minerve
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Minerve: A stunning town made up of pretty stone houses, charming cobbled streets and perched high on a thin sliver of land with a river running on both sides. It is accessible only via a high bridge. It was the site of a famous siege in the mediaeval age with Cathars valiantly defending the town and Catholics catapulting rocks across the ravine.
Mirepoix: A beautiful town dating back to the 13th century and most famous for its arcaded market square (Les Couverts). The houses here date from the thirteenth to fifteenth centuries. Well worth a visit on market day: Monday. Hint: Hit market day early; parking becomes challenging later in the morning. Buy local produce and enjoy a coffee in the old medieval square. There is a tourist office in the square to check out other seasonal events such as pottery fairs and brocantes.
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Mirepoix
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Mirepoix: A beautiful town dating back to the 13th century and most famous for its arcaded market square (Les Couverts). The houses here date from the thirteenth to fifteenth centuries. Well worth a visit on market day: Monday. Hint: Hit market day early; parking becomes challenging later in the morning. Buy local produce and enjoy a coffee in the old medieval square. There is a tourist office in the square to check out other seasonal events such as pottery fairs and brocantes.
Narbonne: A beautiful historic town on the Calan de la Robine; famous for its gothic cathedral and pretty shopping lanes. Well worth a visit to have lunch in an outdoor café then explore the town by foot. There is plenty of underground parking as you enter the centre of town.
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Narbonne
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Narbonne: A beautiful historic town on the Calan de la Robine; famous for its gothic cathedral and pretty shopping lanes. Well worth a visit to have lunch in an outdoor café then explore the town by foot. There is plenty of underground parking as you enter the centre of town.
Perpignan This is the last major town in Languedoc before the Spanish border. It is very much Catalan with a real mix of cultures. There is an international airport here too with regular flights from the UK and Europe. Head into centre of town for fantastic restaurants, historic architecture and a lovely mix of French and Catalan cultures.
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Perpignan
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Perpignan This is the last major town in Languedoc before the Spanish border. It is very much Catalan with a real mix of cultures. There is an international airport here too with regular flights from the UK and Europe. Head into centre of town for fantastic restaurants, historic architecture and a lovely mix of French and Catalan cultures.
Pézenas feels much more sophisticated than other towns of similar size in Languedoc (bar Uzès) - with its nice restaurants, cafés and many arts and crafts shops and galleries. The architecture is grand - with lots of beautiful carved stone fasçades - thanks to the town having been the seat of Languedoc's parliament until the mid-1600s. If you get a chance - visit the Hôtel Lacoste - with it's gorgeous vaulted courtyard. The town's Saturday morning market is also lots of fun. Renowned for its antiques, Pézenas has almost fifty brocante and antiques dealers present throughout the year. Most antique shops are situated in the western part of the town. Twice a year, on the 1st Sunday in May and the 2nd Sunday in October, they hold the ‘Grand Déballage’, a large antiques market which extends over almost a kilometre on the Nationale 113 road. Over 150 exhibitors are present throughout the day. Just over an hour’s drive from Ribuate; head towards Beziers then follow the signs north-east to Pézenas.
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Pézenas
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Pézenas feels much more sophisticated than other towns of similar size in Languedoc (bar Uzès) - with its nice restaurants, cafés and many arts and crafts shops and galleries. The architecture is grand - with lots of beautiful carved stone fasçades - thanks to the town having been the seat of Languedoc's parliament until the mid-1600s. If you get a chance - visit the Hôtel Lacoste - with it's gorgeous vaulted courtyard. The town's Saturday morning market is also lots of fun. Renowned for its antiques, Pézenas has almost fifty brocante and antiques dealers present throughout the year. Most antique shops are situated in the western part of the town. Twice a year, on the 1st Sunday in May and the 2nd Sunday in October, they hold the ‘Grand Déballage’, a large antiques market which extends over almost a kilometre on the Nationale 113 road. Over 150 exhibitors are present throughout the day. Just over an hour’s drive from Ribuate; head towards Beziers then follow the signs north-east to Pézenas.
Quillan: A very pretty town set in the centre of a circle of mountains and on the edge of the Aude River. Best known for water sports such as white-water rafting & kayaking. Be sure to check out the Gorges de l’Aude and then drive on to see the Cathar castles at Peyrepertuse and Queribus to the east. By car - 1hr, 25min.
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Quillan
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Quillan: A very pretty town set in the centre of a circle of mountains and on the edge of the Aude River. Best known for water sports such as white-water rafting & kayaking. Be sure to check out the Gorges de l’Aude and then drive on to see the Cathar castles at Peyrepertuse and Queribus to the east. By car - 1hr, 25min.
Rennes les Bains: A beautiful village with natural hot springs. It is one of many spa towns in the Languedoc area where visitors have enjoyed the natural hot springs for centuries. You can visit the public pools or venture further to discover the natural springs: ‘les bains doux’; a waterfall around 36 degrees, or ‘les bains forts’, a pool at around 42 degrees. The first one is at the entrance of the village, down the road where you can see the ruins of the Roman Baths. To get to the waterfall, cross the river (take care the slippery rocks) then sit under the fall for a great water massage! The second one is in the middle of the village, down a passage from the street at the other side of the bridge. You can lie down in the very hot pool, then cool off afterwards in the nearby cool river. Today, Rennes les Bains is a modern thermal spa town with the latest ‘thermalisme’ equipment. The French take spas very seriously and many travel here to ‘take the waters’ as a cure for rheumatism and other conditions.
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Rennes-les-Bains
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Rennes les Bains: A beautiful village with natural hot springs. It is one of many spa towns in the Languedoc area where visitors have enjoyed the natural hot springs for centuries. You can visit the public pools or venture further to discover the natural springs: ‘les bains doux’; a waterfall around 36 degrees, or ‘les bains forts’, a pool at around 42 degrees. The first one is at the entrance of the village, down the road where you can see the ruins of the Roman Baths. To get to the waterfall, cross the river (take care the slippery rocks) then sit under the fall for a great water massage! The second one is in the middle of the village, down a passage from the street at the other side of the bridge. You can lie down in the very hot pool, then cool off afterwards in the nearby cool river. Today, Rennes les Bains is a modern thermal spa town with the latest ‘thermalisme’ equipment. The French take spas very seriously and many travel here to ‘take the waters’ as a cure for rheumatism and other conditions.
Rennes-Le-Chateau: Dan Brown may have made this little village famous in his Da Vinci Code books but the real story of the village’s priest, Béranger Saunière and his sudden, mysterious wealth is much more interesting. Legend has it that untold treasures are hidden in the vicinity of Rennes-Le-Chateau and the village – thousands visit every year in the hope of finding lost, Cathar gold – to the extent that the village has had to put up ‘no digging’ signs to stop treasure hunting tourists. By car – 1hr 20min.
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Rennes-le-Château
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Rennes-Le-Chateau: Dan Brown may have made this little village famous in his Da Vinci Code books but the real story of the village’s priest, Béranger Saunière and his sudden, mysterious wealth is much more interesting. Legend has it that untold treasures are hidden in the vicinity of Rennes-Le-Chateau and the village – thousands visit every year in the hope of finding lost, Cathar gold – to the extent that the village has had to put up ‘no digging’ signs to stop treasure hunting tourists. By car – 1hr 20min.
A charmingly restored village of cobbled streets, wedged at the bottom of a dramatic ravine. Beautiful, dramatic and very atmospheric. In the centre sits the abbey founded by Charlemagne's counselor Guile who returned in 800 from Rome to Languedoc with three pieces of the cross. It is now an UNESCO World Heritage site - and perfectly restored. The town can be very touristy in summer. Top Tip: Pack your swimming things and cool off with a dip in the river near St Guilhem at the Pont du Diable. Approx 1hr30min drive from Ribaute.
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Saint-Guilhem-le-Désert
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A charmingly restored village of cobbled streets, wedged at the bottom of a dramatic ravine. Beautiful, dramatic and very atmospheric. In the centre sits the abbey founded by Charlemagne's counselor Guile who returned in 800 from Rome to Languedoc with three pieces of the cross. It is now an UNESCO World Heritage site - and perfectly restored. The town can be very touristy in summer. Top Tip: Pack your swimming things and cool off with a dip in the river near St Guilhem at the Pont du Diable. Approx 1hr30min drive from Ribaute.
A stunningly charming Languedoc town dating back to Roman times. Encircled by the Boulevard Gambetta, the Medieval town is a maze of small streets and shaded squares lined with 17th and 18th century private mansions. The architecture is beautiful, and its elegant squares are the perfect place for lunch or coffee. In Uzès you'll find Le Duché, an impressive castle belonging to a ducal family of old. An hour-long guided tour takes you through the building, its courtyard and garden, a keep and, of course, the famous 'Tour Bermonde' tower - from which there are superb views of the surrounding countryside. Approx 2hrs 15min drive from Ribuate; a little further afield so worth setting out early and making a day of it.
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Uzès
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A stunningly charming Languedoc town dating back to Roman times. Encircled by the Boulevard Gambetta, the Medieval town is a maze of small streets and shaded squares lined with 17th and 18th century private mansions. The architecture is beautiful, and its elegant squares are the perfect place for lunch or coffee. In Uzès you'll find Le Duché, an impressive castle belonging to a ducal family of old. An hour-long guided tour takes you through the building, its courtyard and garden, a keep and, of course, the famous 'Tour Bermonde' tower - from which there are superb views of the surrounding countryside. Approx 2hrs 15min drive from Ribuate; a little further afield so worth setting out early and making a day of it.
City/town information
Our little village is home to just 120 people. There is a small café on the main road along with a cave where a local winemaker sells his wares. Most mornings, the bread van drives through the village hooting his horn, just listen out for when he is close then dash out to buy fresh bread and pastries from the baker. The river can be found at the bottom of the village; at the bottom of our street, turn left and follow the road around the corner to the bridge. On the opposite side of the bridge, you’ll see a path to the river. Near the bridge is the most popular place to swim with the cascading waterfalls and swimming holes. In the summer, a small make-shift café opens in a garden down near the river selling cold drinks and ice-creams. The local baker delivers fresh bread and pastries to our village daily (except Wednesdays) around 9am (sometimes slightly later) you’ll hear him tooting his horn as he drives through the village – feel free to wave him down to buy fresh bread from the back of his van (cash). Our personal recommendation for the best bread and pastries is to travel 10mins into Lezignan to Marie Blachere Boulangerie on the crossroads near the two large supermarkets before you hit town on the D611. For milk and groceries, you will find a small epicerie (grocers) & boulangerie (baker) in Lagrasse (5 mins away) and larger super markets in Lezignan (10mins away). To head towards Lagrasse, drive to the top of our street and turn right – follow this road and it will take you directly into Lagrasse. To drive towards Lezignan, turn left at the top of our road. This will take you through Fabrezan and then on to Lezignan-Corbieres. Ribaute is a great base for exploring local history and architecture - Narbonne’s fine mediaeval buildings and Roman beginnings; Phoenician Agde; the great mediaeval walled Cité of Carcassonne; Cistercian Abbeys; Cathar Castles from the Albigensian crusades of the early 13th century on hilltops everywhere; fortified cathedrals at Beziers and Capestang; - and the exciting southern cities of Toulouse, Montpellier, Perpignan and Albi - all are within easy reach.
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Ribaute
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Our little village is home to just 120 people. There is a small café on the main road along with a cave where a local winemaker sells his wares. Most mornings, the bread van drives through the village hooting his horn, just listen out for when he is close then dash out to buy fresh bread and pastries from the baker. The river can be found at the bottom of the village; at the bottom of our street, turn left and follow the road around the corner to the bridge. On the opposite side of the bridge, you’ll see a path to the river. Near the bridge is the most popular place to swim with the cascading waterfalls and swimming holes. In the summer, a small make-shift café opens in a garden down near the river selling cold drinks and ice-creams. The local baker delivers fresh bread and pastries to our village daily (except Wednesdays) around 9am (sometimes slightly later) you’ll hear him tooting his horn as he drives through the village – feel free to wave him down to buy fresh bread from the back of his van (cash). Our personal recommendation for the best bread and pastries is to travel 10mins into Lezignan to Marie Blachere Boulangerie on the crossroads near the two large supermarkets before you hit town on the D611. For milk and groceries, you will find a small epicerie (grocers) & boulangerie (baker) in Lagrasse (5 mins away) and larger super markets in Lezignan (10mins away). To head towards Lagrasse, drive to the top of our street and turn right – follow this road and it will take you directly into Lagrasse. To drive towards Lezignan, turn left at the top of our road. This will take you through Fabrezan and then on to Lezignan-Corbieres. Ribaute is a great base for exploring local history and architecture - Narbonne’s fine mediaeval buildings and Roman beginnings; Phoenician Agde; the great mediaeval walled Cité of Carcassonne; Cistercian Abbeys; Cathar Castles from the Albigensian crusades of the early 13th century on hilltops everywhere; fortified cathedrals at Beziers and Capestang; - and the exciting southern cities of Toulouse, Montpellier, Perpignan and Albi - all are within easy reach.
Neighbourhoods
Fabrezan: About 5mins drive away and on the way to Lézignan-Corbières, Fabrezan is a very pretty little village. There is a lovely shallow family-friendly spot to swim here (although it can get quite busy in the summer).
Fabrezan
Fabrezan: About 5mins drive away and on the way to Lézignan-Corbières, Fabrezan is a very pretty little village. There is a lovely shallow family-friendly spot to swim here (although it can get quite busy in the summer).
Lézignan-Corbières: A bigger town about 10mins to the east of Ribuate . This is the best place to go for groceries and fresh milk (Carrefour & Intermarche). The best bakery (Marie Blachere) is on the corner opposite Intermarche – fresh bread baked every few hours Lézignan also has a Wednesday morning market with great produce from the local area. Top tip for market day: arrive early to park near the main street then follow the locals heading in to buy fresh food & other wares. Lézignan also has a small airstrip for local pilots where you will often see parachutists landing. If you’re looking for something fun, visit the Lezignan FlyZone; a wind tunnel where you can try indoor skydiving.
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Lézignan-Corbières
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Lézignan-Corbières: A bigger town about 10mins to the east of Ribuate . This is the best place to go for groceries and fresh milk (Carrefour & Intermarche). The best bakery (Marie Blachere) is on the corner opposite Intermarche – fresh bread baked every few hours Lézignan also has a Wednesday morning market with great produce from the local area. Top tip for market day: arrive early to park near the main street then follow the locals heading in to buy fresh food & other wares. Lézignan also has a small airstrip for local pilots where you will often see parachutists landing. If you’re looking for something fun, visit the Lezignan FlyZone; a wind tunnel where you can try indoor skydiving.
Beautiful Outdoor Scenery
Carmargue: Further afield, the Carmargue is France’s wild west. The region is Europe’s largest river delta and covers an area of over 900 square kilometres. It’s a wild landscape of red salt lagoons teeming with flamingos, herds of wild white horses and farms where Europe’s only cowboys raise fighting bulls. Visitors can explore the area on horseback, quad bike, horse-drawn carriage, hoverdraft or helicopter. Top tip: take your mosquito repellent; the marshes can be teaming with insects particularly in the warmer months.
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Camargue
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Carmargue: Further afield, the Carmargue is France’s wild west. The region is Europe’s largest river delta and covers an area of over 900 square kilometres. It’s a wild landscape of red salt lagoons teeming with flamingos, herds of wild white horses and farms where Europe’s only cowboys raise fighting bulls. Visitors can explore the area on horseback, quad bike, horse-drawn carriage, hoverdraft or helicopter. Top tip: take your mosquito repellent; the marshes can be teaming with insects particularly in the warmer months.
Narbonne Plage: A beautiful family-friendly beach on the Mediterranean. To the south you can see the snow caps of the Pyrenees as they reach the sea. By car – 30mins.
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Narbonne Plage
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Narbonne Plage: A beautiful family-friendly beach on the Mediterranean. To the south you can see the snow caps of the Pyrenees as they reach the sea. By car – 30mins.