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Holiday rentals in Scottish Highlands

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Top-rated holiday rentals in Scottish Highlands

Guests agree: these stays are highly rated for location, cleanliness, and more.

  1. Entire home
  2. Fort Augustus
Bramble Lodge (29508)

This well-located ground floor lodge with views of Loch Ness provides a cosy touring base.. Set on the edge of Fort Augustus, Bramble Lodge is in a peaceful location near Loch Ness. Bramble Lodge is a detached lodge with wonderful views across the fields towards Loch Ness. Located at the southern tip of Loch Ness, Fort Augustus is a lively and popular village with many amenities and is an excellent base for touring the Highlands. At the northern end of Loch Ness lies Inverness, the ‘capital’ of the Highlands with excellent shops and a theatre complex. Nevis Range Ski Centre at Fort William boasts Scotland’s only cable-car system and the World Championship Mountain Bike track. The area hosts a large number of outdoor activities including hill walking, mountain biking, golf, fishing, canoeing, windsurfing and sailing. There are many distilleries, stunning castles, secluded glens and beautiful gardens to visit. Meander along the banks of the Caledonian Canal, or watch the boats navigate the locks. Boat trips on Loch Ness to see Urquhart Castle or to hunt for the Loch Ness monster can be arranged locally. Shop, pub and restaurant ¾ mile.. 5 steps to entrance. All on the ground floor. Open plan living space. Living area: With Freeview TV, DVD player, MP3 player with bluetooth speaker, CD player and patio doors leading to decking. Dining area. Kitchen area: With electric oven, gas hob, microwave, fridge/freezer, dishwasher and washing machine. Bedroom 1: With kingsize bed and en-suite with shower cubicle and toilet. Bedroom 2: With zip and link twin beds (can be super kingsize on request). Bathroom: With shower over bath, and toilet.. Gas central heating, gas, electrcity, bed linen, towels and Wi-Fi included. Travel cot and highchair available on request. Welcome pack. Shed with tumble dryer. Decked and gravelled garden with sitting-out area and garden furniture. Bike store. Private parking for 2 cars. No smoking. Free WiFi

  1. Entire cottage
  2. Highland Council
Owl Cottage, dog-friendly 2-bed near Loch Ness

Get away from it all in a traditional stone cottage in the heart of the Scottish Highlands close to Loch Ness, the Great Glen Way and Ben Nevis, with Fort William and Inverness an easy car journey away. Dogs are very welcome here, with dog-friendly bedspreads and furniture. A super-king bed and bunk beds give plenty of space to relax and the cosy living room features a log-burner. Secure bike storage available in the lockable shed. 20% discount for stays of 1 week or more.

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  1. Entire cottage
  2. Fort Augustus
Briar Bank - a Scottish Highland cottage getaway

Take it easy at this unique and tranquil getaway. Briar Bank, a traditional stone cottage a few minutes stroll from the centre of the picturesque village of Fort Augustus and Loch Ness is the perfect location for keen mountain bikers, munro baggers or walkers. There are many outstanding hikes and trails nearby with the most popular being the Great Glen Way. The cottage comfortably sleeps four guests and has recently been modernised but retains many of its original features and character.

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Other great holiday rentals in Scottish Highlands

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  1. Private room
  2. Highland Council
Lovely double room, or twin (double + single bed).
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  1. Tiny home
  2. Fort Augustus
Field House
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  1. Private room
  2. Auchterawe
Auchterawe House, in Auchterawe Forest
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  1. Entire cottage
  2. Inverness-shire
The Quarry House
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  1. Entire bungalow
  2. Highland Council
Gorgeous, modern Loch Ness apartment
  1. Entire cottage
  2. Highland
tigh na coilltean
  1. Entire place
  2. Aberchalder
Coorie Doon Cabin! Great Scottish Welcome
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  1. Campervan/Motorhome
  2. Highland Council
Nutkins Fort Augustus
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  1. Tiny home
  2. Fort Augustus
Apple Pip - self catering tiny house, Loch Ness
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  1. Entire home
  2. Fort Augustus
Lovat Terrace
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  1. Campervan/Motorhome
  2. Highland Council
Cosy caravan in popular village of Fort Augustus
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  1. Entire chalet
  2. Fort Augustus
The Chalet

Your guide to Scottish Highlands

Introduction

The Scottish Highlands live up to the romantic reputation: Narrow valleys, mysterious lochs, and castle ruins mark the mountainous landscape, where remote villages and coastal fishing ports keep ancient traditions alive. If you’re looking for solitude, then you’re sure to find it in the Highlands. This rugged region, which comprises the upper half of Scotland’s territory, ranks among the most sparsely populated in the United Kingdom. This makes the Highlands’ outdoors the big draw — the largest national park (Cairngorms) and highest peak (Ben Nevis) in the British Isles only add to the adventurous allure. Come here for muddy trails to walk, summits to climb, and rivers to paddle. Squeeze a stop at the popular Loch Ness into your itinerary. At the end of each cold day, you’ll find plenty of old pubs to warm you up.


How do I get around Scottish Highlands?

Train journeys may be the most scenic way to arrive from the more populous Lowlands of southern Scotland. Intercity buses also connect the major towns and cities throughout the country, and sleeper trains and overnight buses link the Highlands directly to London.

If you intend to spend time exploring the outdoors, you’ll get more out of your visit to the Scottish Highlands with a car, as local transportation options can be slim. You can rent a car at the major airports, with Inverness Airport (INV) being the primary air travel hub in the area. Highway connections from Edinburgh, Glasgow, or Aberdeen make the road trip into the Highlands easy.


When is the best time to stay in a vacation rental in Scottish Highlands?

The unpredictable Scottish weather is often the subject of lighthearted jokes, though the one about four seasons in a day rings true in the Highlands. Due to the varied elevations and microclimates, the weather can change quite drastically in a short drive. But mild temperatures and lots of precipitation are common everywhere, so pack layers and a hooded raincoat year-round.

The warmest months to stay in one of the area's cottages are June, July, and August, when Scotland’s northerly latitude makes for some long sunny days. Summer high temperatures average close to 60 degrees Fahrenheit, with warm spells rarely reaching as high as 80. Come autumn, high temperatures drop to the 40s to 50s. Winter brings the highest annual rainfall and plenty of snow in higher elevations. The mountains of the Highlands experience reliable snow most seasons, making for ideal conditions at Scotland’s ski resorts.


What are the top things to do in Scottish Highlands?

Cairngorms National Park

Twice the size of England’s much-loved Lakes District, this sprawling wilderness area is the largest national park in Britain. Cairngorms has forest trails, snowy summits, and all kinds of animals and birds. In the summer you can lounge on the shores of Loch Morlich in the Glenmore Forest Park. Come winter, skiers and snowboarders ride the lifts up Cairngorm Mountain for some of Scotland’s finest slopes. Aviemore is the tourism hub within the national park.

Isle of Skye

Just off Scotland’s west coast, the Isle of Skye claims some of the most magical landscapes in the Highlands: imposing castles, the pastel-painted town of Portree, and the iconic Fairy Pools, a series of astonishingly blue waterfalls in the Glen Brittle forest.

Ben Nevis

Rising to an elevation of more than 4,400 feet, Ben Nevis is the highest mountain in the British Isles. In the summer months, it’s also one of the most popular peaks to climb, inspiring more than 100,000 people to try and reach its summit. The majority of hikers take the Pony Track trail (weather permitting), a strenuous 10.5-mile trek that takes most people 7 to 9 hours to complete.