Some content has been automatically translated. Show original language

Holiday rentals in Andalusia

Find and book unique accommodation on Airbnb

Top-rated holiday rentals in Andalusia

Guests agree: these stays are highly rated for location, cleanliness, and more.

SUPERHOST
  1. Private room
  2. Málaga
Cozy single room, in family home!

Enjoy a good night's rest in our house.

  1. Entire home
  2. Mijas Costa
Villa Unica for 7 people.

Note: You can directly book the best price if your travel dates are available, all discounts are already included. In the following house description you will find all information about our listing. 5-room house 300 m2 on 4 levels. Spacious and bright, beautiful and modern furnishings: living room with TV, flat screen and DVD. Exit to the terrace. Large, open kitchen (oven, dishwasher, 4 ceramic glass hob hotplates, microwave) with dining table. Sep. WC. Air-conditioning, forced-air heating....

SUPERHOST
  1. Entire cottage
  2. Benalauría
"La Parra", rural tourism. Your home in paradise.

TRANQUILITY, TRANQUILITY and NATURE A cozy cottage made of stone, lime and wood. Rescued from the past so you can enjoy it and spend a few days full of peace and quiet. With space for two people, it has a living room with fireplace, dining room and fully equipped kitchen on the first floor. The room and bathroom, located in a beautiful attic, leads to a terrace from where you can enjoy incredible views of the Valle del Genal.

Holiday rentals for every style

Get the amount of space that is right for you.

  • Homes
  • Hotels
  • Unique stays

Other great holiday rentals in Andalusia

SUPERHOST
  1. Private room
  2. Nerja
Private and cozy room.
  1. Entire rental unit
  2. Estepona
Estepona Roof Top View 2 for 4 persons.
  1. Entire rental unit
  2. Estepona
Bahia Dorada for 4 people.
  1. Entire rental unit
  2. Marbella
Pueblo Arabesque for 4 people.
  1. Entire rental unit
  2. Marbella
Lorcrimar for 4 persons.
  1. Entire rental unit
  2. Marbella
Marbella Real for 4 people.
SUPERHOST
  1. Private room
  2. Málaga
Youth room
SUPERHOST
  1. Private room
  2. Málaga
An extra large room with a private bathroom.
SUPERHOST
  1. Private room
  2. Málaga
Room with private bathroom 5 minutes from the beach .
  1. Entire home
  2. Marbella
Marbella old town for 4 persons.
SUPERHOST
  1. Private room
  2. Málaga
Room 5 minutes away from the beach!
  1. Entire home
  2. Frigiliana
Tres Palmeras (FRG131) for 4 persons.

Your guide to Andalusia

Welcome to Andalusia

Encompassing the southernmost part of the Spanish mainland, the wide coastal region of Andalusia teems with a richly varied and utterly unique heritage. Arabic tribes from North Africa ruled here from the 8th to 15th centuries; their legacy endures, not least in the eye-catching Moorish architecture of the Alhambra in Granada and the Mezquita (mosque) in Córdoba. The abounding culture of the inland cities, which include Seville and Jaén, are complemented by Andalusia’s famously pretty pueblos blancos (white villages) and the rugged beauty of its landscape, from the white-capped mountains of the Sierra Nevada to the wetlands of Doñana National Park. Its Mediterranean coastline is well known to holidaymakers; the Costa del Sol is a popular vacation spot, and Malaga has become a major art destination. But the wilder, Atlantic-facing cliffs and beaches have just as much to offer, from kitesurfing in Tarifa to picturesque fishing towns and the historic port cities of Cadiz and Huelva.


How do I get around Andalusia?

The two international airports in Andalusia are Malaga (AGP) and Seville (SVQ); with its 500 miles of coastline, the region is also well served by cruise liners and ferries. Trains run between the major cities, although buses are more common for connecting the smaller towns and villages. However, these operate infrequently and many visitors find that the best way to see the most of this large region is by car. It’s rarely worth driving in the cities themselves, where traffic and navigation can make life difficult, and where most sights can be covered on foot; taxis and rideshares also operate widely. Andalusia is popular with cyclists (you’re allowed to take your bike on most buses); just be aware that the terrain can be hilly, so you’ll need a reasonable level of fitness.


When is the best time to stay in a vacation rental in Andalusia?

Summers are hot in Andalusia, which can make touring, sightseeing, and other outdoor activities quite burdensome between June and August. The best time to visit one of the area’s villas is spring, when it’s pleasant to be out and about and the countryside is alive with colourful flowers. It’s also when many of the region’s most lively and important festivals and ferias (fairs) are staged. In the days leading up to Easter, the streets of Seville fill with the Holy Week processions of Semana Santa, and they’re followed two weeks later by the equally popular April Fair. Horses are the centre of attention at Jerez’s Feria del Caballo in May, which is also the month for Córdoba’s Fiesta de los Patios, when the residents throw open their private courtyards to all comers. Autumn and winter are mild enough to offer good hiking weather, and come February, Cadiz is the place to be for its huge annual Carnaval.


What are the top things to do in Andalusia?

Las Alpujarras

In the southern valleys of the Sierra Nevada sit a string of 50 villages built in the Berber style, their flat-roofed, whitewashed houses gleaming from the surrounding countryside. Unique local crafts and cuisines have flourished here for centuries, and the villages are connected by awe-inspiring hiking trails.

Cabo de Gata-Níjar Natural Park

This national park is home to Europe’s only desert – but don’t let that thought put you off. There’s magnificence to its vast, untouched beaches and the cliffs of volcanic rock that back them, with ancient fishing villages dotted here and there along the length of the coast.

Ronda

Suspended across a 500-foot gorge, this town of two halves in the mountains of Málaga is an extraordinary spectacle. The Puente Nuevo that bridges the El Tajo ravine is a miracle of engineering completed in 1793 and the focal point of the town. But there’s plenty more history to be had in this ancient place, from its 13th-century Arab architecture to its Renaissance square.